(From left) Avery Shoaf (Mike’s business partner), Mike Hall and son Connor Hall amidst the massive collection of cars at Mike’s property near Tappen. (Image contributed)

(From left) Avery Shoaf (Mike’s business partner), Mike Hall and son Connor Hall amidst the massive collection of cars at Mike’s property near Tappen. (Image contributed)

From rusted to restored, new docu-series puts Shuswap on display

Classic car restoration show Rust Valley Restorers, based in Tappen, B.C., premieres Dec. 6

Nestled in the heart of the Shuswap in B.C.’s Interior lies a classic car lover’s dream: a sprawling collection of 400 iconic vehicles just waiting to be restored to their former glory as kings of the road.

It’s the collection of Mike Hall, a resident of the small community of Tappen near Salmon Arm, and it’s set to make a debut on the small-screen as the focus of the History Channel television show Rust Valley Restorers.

Mike Hall definitely stands out in the small community, getting his nickname, the “Rasta Blasta,” from his long blonde dreadlocks and his day-job blasting rock faces with explosives. His car collection ranges in condition from wrecked, rusted chassis housing valuable parts to near-mint collector’s pieces just needing a finishing touch.

The cars are as varied in their condition as they are in make and model.

Hall has been amassing this collection for 40 years, and has been looking for people interested in restorations to help offload some of the surplus. After making it public online that his massive collection was open for bidding, he soon found a flood of interest coming in which grabbed the attention of auto magazines and the online car community.

“I put my whole place up for sale, a 40-year collection of over 400 cars, and it kind of went nuts!” he says. “I had people calling me from England and the U.S., all over the world. I thought we had the place sold a few times to guys from Switzerland and the States. From that exposure, five or six people wanted to do a show with us.”

Related: Tappen resident seeks classic car collectors for new TV show

Following this, the collection was documented by several publications in the car community, such as Roadkill. When a viral video snowballed the popularity of the car collection, the idea of a television show came up at the beginning of 2018. After close to eight months of filming between the day job – blasting rocks with dynamite, Rust Valley Restorers is set to premiere Dec. 6 on the History Channel.

“It was definitely a different experience,” comments Connor Hall, Mike’s son and business partner. “It was a little weird getting used to having a camera in your face all the time.”

Now in semi-retirement, Mike is taking this chance to live out his dream of restoring classic cars while Connor focuses on the family business.

“Basically, I worked all year all over the province and I kept buying and buying. And then finally, I am 62 and I said ‘what am I going to do with 400 cars?’ My whole dream is I was going to retire and build cars, and that is the emphasis of the show: If not now, when?” Mike says. “I have seen my buddies who collect cars and run into health problems and their family is left with a bunch of stuff they don’t want or need, and I don’t want to do that to my wife and kids because they will curse me for eternity! So I figured, let’s build the place, start the show and give it a shot.”

While also featuring as a fixture on Rust Valley Restorers, Connor is also busy with the rock-blasting business.

“My dad sits at home and plays with his cars and I go to work and make him the money to afford to do so,” Connor jokes.

Some of the cars which feature on the show were restored for clients, while others were done out of a labour of love. Without spoiling anything too much, Mike noted they worked on everything from a 1940s-era Dodge Power Wagon to big block Chevelles, learning on the fly just how complex it was all going to be.

“There are always more problems than you can prepare for. It’s like unravelling a sweater, you just want to pull that one out- of-place thread and then you look down and you have 500 feet of yarn at your feet,” Mike says. “It’s been an extreme learning curve. They say you can’t buy experience but it’s very expensive to obtain, and I got a lot of expensive experience this year.”

Related: Photos: Classic Antique Car Show at R.J. Haney Heritage Village

Despite the huge size of the collection, both Mike and Connor can agree on something they would love to have to round out their collection: a 1957 to ‘67 split-window Corvette. And, while most of the collection is open for new owners, Mike stands firm on a few of his all-time favourites.

“In 400 cars there is some gems and some granite boulders, and when people come to buy the gems sometimes I am like Charleton Heston: you will have to pry it from my cold, dead hands,” Mike says. “Even if I don’t drive some of my cars, I just look at them and it puts a huge grin on my face. Even if it never moves, I can just go and rub the hood. It’s a weird thing.”

The majority of the show is set in and around Tappen, and both Mike and Connor are happy to get the chance to showcase their community to the world, incorporating some of their friends and other local collectors into the mix as well.

“I think it’s cool we are doing something here. You watch TV and all you see is these car shows in Las Vegas or California or down south in the U.S., but they don’t have anything in Canada,” Connor says.

However, both Mike and Connor note that it’s tough to stay low-key about their latest project in the little town of Tappen.

“I get called Hollywood about 10 times a day,” Connor says with a laugh.

“It is getting kind of freaky. I can’t go anywhere in Tappen without people making jokes like ‘hey, there goes the superstar,’” Mike adds. “I just say, don’t worry, I am not going to change, I am always going to be the same a**hole I always was.”

Rust Valley Restorers premieres Thursday, Dec. 6 at 10 p.m. PST on the History Channel.

Interested in new or used vehicles? Visit TodaysDrive.com today!


 

@Jodi_Brak117
jodi.brak@saobserver.net

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

 

Mike Hall, shown here with a restored Chevelle SS at his property near Tappen, is the focal point of the History Channel show Rust Valley Restorers which premiers Dec. 6. (Image contributed)

Mike Hall, shown here with a restored Chevelle SS at his property near Tappen, is the focal point of the History Channel show Rust Valley Restorers which premiers Dec. 6. (Image contributed)

Just Posted

More and more graffiti has appeared in Ladysmith’s downtown core during the pandemic. (Cole Schisler photo)
Council creates rebate program to encourage graffiti clean up

Property owners can receive up to $50 to help fund graffiti removal

Rick Ruppenthal of Saltair will host a 12-hour talk-a-thon Friday, June 18 over Facebook live. (Photo submitted)
Talk-a-thon to focus on men’s mental health issues

Saltair man spearheading a campaign to generate more conversation during fundraiser

(File photo)
Poverty reduction survey identifies 10 poverty themes

Poverty reduction plan will be finalized in July 2021

Nanaimo-Ladysmith MP Paul Manly says he has no intentions of leaving the Green Party. (House of Commons image)
Island Green MPs have “no intention” of leaving the party after ‘heartbreaking’ departure

Manly, May only remaining Green MPs after Jenica Atwin left for the Liberals over internal disputes

Maxwell Johnson is seen in Bella Bella, B.C., in an undated photo. The Indigenous man from British Columbia has filed complaints with the B.C. Human Rights Tribunal and the Canadian Human Rights Commission after he and his granddaughter were handcuffed when they tried to open a bank account. THE CANADIAN PRESS/HO-Heiltsuk Nation, Damien Gillis, *MANDATORY CREDIT*
VIDEO: Chiefs join human rights case of Indigenous man handcuffed by police in B.C. bank

Maxwell Johnson said he wants change, not just words, from Vancouver police

A nurse prepares a shot of the COVID-19 vaccine at the Yukon Convention Centre in Whitehorse on Wednesday, March 3, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Mike Thomas
Vancouver couple pleads guilty to breaking Yukon COVID rules, travelling for vaccine

Chief Judge Michael Cozens agreed with a joint sentencing submission,

An inmate in solitary confinement given lunch on Tuesday, May 10, 2016. THE CANADIAN/Lars Hagberg
22-hour cap on solitary confinement for youth in custody still too long: B.C. lawyer

Jennifer Metcalfe was horrified to hear a youth had spent a total of 78 straight days in isolation

Flowers and candles were laid on the driveway of the Weber home, where Kerri Weber was found dead in November 2020. (Black Press Media file photo)
Greater Victoria man to stand trial for death of his wife last November

Ken Weber is charged with second-degree murder of his wife, Kerri Weber

The discovery of a missing woman’s body in Nanaimo earlier this month is now being treated as homicide, say Nanaimo RCMP. (File photo)
Discovery of woman’s body in downtown Nanaimo now being investigated as a homicide

Amy Watts was found dead near Albert Street and Victoria Crescent on June 3

People line up to get their COVID-19 vaccine at a vaccination centre, Thursday, June 10, 2021 in Montreal. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Ryan Remiorz
Vaccines, low COVID case counts increase Father’s Day hope, but risk is still there

Expert says people will have to do their own risk calculus before popping in on Papa

B.C. Premier John Horgan listens as Finance Minister Selina Robinson presents the province’s latest budget, April 20, 2021. The budget projects $19 billion in deficits over three years. (Hansard TV)
B.C. government budget balloons, beyond COVID-19 response

Provincial payroll up 104,000 positions, $10 billion since 2017

Ocean debris is shown on Long Beach in Tofino, B.C. on April, 18, 2012. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward
Shoreline cleanup finds COVID-related trash increased during height of the pandemic

Great Canadian Shoreline Cleanup reports litter from single-use food packaging nearly doubled

Doctor David Vallejo and his fiancee Doctor Mavelin Bonilla hold photos of themselves working, as they kiss at their home in Quito, Ecuador, Wednesday, June 9, 2021. Doctor Vallejo and Doctor Bonilla suspended their wedding in order to tend to COVID-19 patients and in the process Vallejo got sick himself with the disease, ending up in an ICU for several days. (AP Photo/Dolores Ochoa)
Love, sacrifice and surviving COVID-19: one couple’s story

COVID hits Ecuadorian doctors who delayed wedding to treat sick

Most Read