Rain Stacey is looking forward to getting an ‘army issue brush cut’ Jan. 30 at the Royal Canadian Legion’s Ladysmith branch. Her Rapunzel-like locks have been growing for four years

Rain Stacey is looking forward to getting an ‘army issue brush cut’ Jan. 30 at the Royal Canadian Legion’s Ladysmith branch. Her Rapunzel-like locks have been growing for four years

Angel’s hair about to go for a cause

The Portuguese have a tradition of cutting off their hair in memory of a departed friend or family member,

The Portuguese have a tradition of cutting off their hair in memory of a departed friend or family member, and say that as the hair grows back in, healing begins.

That was the reason Rain Stacey first had her hair cut military style. But for the past four years she’s been growing her hair for another ‘army issue brush cut,’ this time in memory of all vets, and as a fund-raiser for the Ladysmith Branch 171 of the Royal Canadian Legion.

But her father Raulph Silvey, who died March 5, 2001, will still be very much on her mind when Stacey goes under the scissors of stylist Sheila Charett of Wavemakers Jan. 30. Wounded in the Second World War, Silvey spent 24 months recovering in Shaughnessy Hospital.

“His quality of life wasn’t what it should have been,” Stacey said.

But then, a lot of vets have physical and emotional scars they have struggled with, so she’s taking a broader perspective. “Why don’t we make it a fund-raiser for all vets,” she said.

Hair longer than waist-length is becoming a bit of an encumbrance, so getting it cut will be a relief of sorts. “I’m ready for it,” Stacey said.

Her three foot locks will be donated to Angel Hair for Kids, which provides wigs for children who have lost their hair during chemotherapy treatments for cancer.

Stacey will have her hair cut at the Ladysmith Legion Jan. 30, 6 p.m. Beer and burgers will be available for $10, as well as hotdogs and soft drinks for children.