Provincial health officer Dr. Bonnie Henry updates B.C.’s COVID-19 situation at the B.C. legislature, Nov. 23, 2020. (B.C. government)

Provincial health officer Dr. Bonnie Henry updates B.C.’s COVID-19 situation at the B.C. legislature, Nov. 23, 2020. (B.C. government)

B.C. daily COVID-19 cases hits stay high with 695 cases Tuesday

Further restrictions on indoor exercise take effect

Editor’s note: The B.C. health ministry made an error in reporting Fraser Health data between Nov.17 and Nov. 24. This story originally reflected the data officials released on Nov. 24; it has now been updated with the new daily cases and Fraser Health numbers.

B.C.’s surge of new coronavirus stayed high with 695 diagnosed cases on Tuesday, as public health officials tightened down on indoor group exercise activities.

The latest figures from the B.C. Centre for Disease Control include 7,732 active cases, 284 people currently in hospital, 61 in critical care, and 10 additional deaths attributed to COVID-19, for a total of 358 confirmed deaths since the pandemic began early this year. A total of 19,605 people have recovered, from a total of 28,348 diagnosed cases overall.

Of the new cases, 432 are in the Fraser Health region, 174 in Vancouver Coastal, 49 in Interior Health, 29 in the Northern Health region and 11 on Vancouver Island. The results come from 11,037 tests completed as of Nov. 24.

The recent rise of daily diagnosed cases in B.C. dipped briefly below 600 last week, followed by 713 up to Saturday, 626 up to Sunday and 594 up to Monday.

There are two new health-care facility outbreaks, at Valleyhaven Guest Home in Chilliwack and Little Mountain Place in Vancouver, and an outbreak at Fraserview Intermediate Care Lodge in Richmond has been declared over.

“B.C.’s health-care workers are in our labs and hospitals, at our testing sites and in our communities,” provincial health officer Dr. Bonnie Henry and Health Minister Adrian Dix said in a statement. “These people are our health-care system. They are there to support all of us without question and without pause, and we need to show that same support to them by all of us doing our part.”

In an updated set of public health orders posted to the B.C. government website Tuesday, the province noted “venues that organize or operate other types of indoor group physical activities must suspend them temporarily while new guidance is being developed.” Those include dance studios, gymnastics, martial arts, yoga, pilates, strength and conditioning and cheerleading, as well as the earlier suspension of the more strenuous indoor exercises of spin, hot yoga and high-intensity interval training.

RELATED: Dance studios, all indoor group fitness ordered closed

RELATED: Rapid tests ‘not a panacea’ for senior care homes


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