The Port of Prince Rupert is one of six Canadian locations with a high amount of vessel traffic where baseline data will be gathered for a new data management system that will help researchers better understand and protect marine ecosystems. (The Northern View file photo)

B.C. ports part of data integration project to protect marine ecosystems

The $1.2 M federally funded program will draw crucial baseline data from Canada’s three coastlines

The federal government has committed $1.2 million for a data management system considered crucial to understanding and protecting marine ecosystems in Canadian ports.

The web-based system, being developed by the St. Lawrence Global Observatory (SLGO), will collect baseline data from 39 environmental projects from non-governmental organizations and coastline communities where increased vessel traffic is a concern.

READ MORE: Port Authority leading the way for seafarers to have a shore-break

“The SLGO team is pleased to take part in this major project and to accompany all these partners towards a better management of their data. Making the data standardized and available to all will promote the reuse of a very large number of these data for a better understanding of marine ecosystems for the benefit of future generations,”Andréane Bastien, director general of SLGO said.”

Study areas with heavy or increasing vessel traffic include Port of Vancouver, B.C.; the Port of Prince Rupert, B.C.; the Lower St. Lawrence Estuary, QC; the Port of Saint John, NB; Placentia Bay, NL; and Iqaluit, NU.

The project is part of the $50.8 million Coastal Environmental Baseline Program established in 2017 under the $1.5 billion Oceans Protection Plan. The program is a collaboration between Fisheries and Oceans Canada scientists, Indigenous and coastal communities, non-governmental organizations, academia and other local partners.

READ MORE: Port’s performance remains strong during COVID-19

Minister of Fisheries, Oceans and the Canadian Coast Guard, Bernadette Jordan announced the project funding in a press release July 7.

“Science is at the foundation of every decision we make at DFO,” Jordan stated. “If we are to succeed in protecting 25 per cent of Canada’s oceans by 2025, we must have access to the very best science and research. That’s exactly why we are proud to fund this important project led by the St. Lawrence Global Observatory.

“It will increase our understanding of Canada’s coastal ecosystems and empower our government to take informed and effective action as we work to protect our oceans for generations to come.”


@ashwadhwani
ashley.wadhwani@bpdigital.ca

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Want to support local journalism? Make a donation here.

fishingScience

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

Downtown Ladysmith vehicle fire quickly extinguished

LFR Lieutenant Matt Rickett said that everyone involved responded exactly how they were supposed to

QUIZ: How much do you know about British Columbia?

On this B.C. Day long weekend, put your knowledge of our province to the test

Nanaimo-Ladysmith students will be going back to school full time in the fall in ‘learning groups’

Nanaimo Ladysmith Public Schools to submit back-to-school plan to ministry in August

LMS hosts virtual Kids’ Pirate Event in late August

Kids’ Pirate Event will feature five days of online content

B.C. records 146 new COVID-19 cases through long weekend

More that 28 people tested positive for the virus each day since Friday

Canucks tame Minnesota Wild 4-3 to even NHL qualifying series

J.T. Miller leads Vancouver with goal and an assist

COVID-19 vaccine efforts provide hope but no silver bullet to stop pandemic: Tam

There are more than two dozen vaccines for COVID-19 in clinical trials around the world

Two people die in propane heated outdoor shower near Princeton

Couple was attending a long weekend gathering

Study shines light on what makes LGBTQ+ youth feel safe in a community

The study goes beyond looking at school or family supports

Alberta to require masks at schools this fall, but still no mandate in B.C.

B.C. students are also set to return to classrooms in September

B.C. to allow customers to buy cannabis online for in-store pickup at private shops

Age verification will still be required inside the store

30% of British Columbians would ‘wait and see’ before taking COVID vaccine: poll

Some are concerned about side effects, while others don’t think the virus is a big deal

Most Read