B.C. trying to revive climate program

B.C. reaches out to U.S. states and the clean energy industry to keep its greenhouse gas reduction goals in sight

Environment Minister Mary Polak

The B.C. government has reached out to U.S. states and the domestic clean energy industry in an effort to keep its greenhouse gas reduction goals in sight.

Energy Minister Bill Bennett hopes to have details out by the end of the year for a “modest” clean energy program he promised to private power developers at a conference in Vancouver this week.

With BC Hydro projecting an electricity surplus in the near future, there won’t be another clean power call any time soon for run-of-river, wind and other producers, Bennett said in an interview. A priority will be energy development for aboriginal communities, which have used small power production to get off diesel generators and to generate new income.

The new commitment comes as BC Hydro continues weeding out proposals that haven’t delivered on power purchase contracts, in order to cut down on the utility’s growing debt.

The government also signed an agreement this week with western U.S. states called the Pacific Coast Collaborative, to extend efforts to put a regional price on carbon. California has launched its own cap-and-trade system for carbon emissions, and B.C. continues to administer a carbon tax on fossil fuels imposed in 2006.

B.C. Environment Minister Mary Polak signed the agreement in San Francisco with Washington Governor Jay Inslee, Oregon Governor John Kitzhaber and California Governor Jerry Brown.

Kitzhaber said more than 500,000 people on the North American west coast now work in green economy jobs, and the region will lead the way in the future.

“We are here to reject the myth that jobs and the environment are in conflict,” he said.

Meanwhile, B.C. continues its central effort, to develop liquefied natural gas exports to Asia. The province has exempted greenhouse gas emissions used to process and export LNG, arguing that it will displace coal in China and other countries with a less emission-intensive fuel.

 

Just Posted

Ladysmith marijuana producer bought by Aphria in $230M deal

Ontario licensed marijuana producer Aphria has reached an agreement to acquire Ladysmith-based… Continue reading

CVRD hikes fire protection requisition limit for rural Ladysmith by 25 per cent

Cowichan Valley Regional District is increasing the annual requisition limit for fire… Continue reading

Ladysmith runner reaches podium on new Pioneer 8K course

Meg Lewis-Schneider with CeeVacs Roadrunners Club sets event record

Buckerfields targets booming West Shore

New store set to open April 1 in Langford Parkway location

B.C. boy denied $19,000-per-month drug to ease ‘crippling pain’ for 3rd time

Sooke mom Jillian Lanthier says son Landen Alexa has been forgotten about by Premier John Horgan

Senior randomly stabbed in B.C. mall food court

Woman arrested after victim, 71, suffers serious injuries

UPDATE: City of Nanaimo senior manager dismissed

Chief operations officer Brad McRae no longer employed by the city

B.C. Liberal hopefuls begin final leadership push

Five MLAs, one outsider pitch policies to party members

UPDATED: ‘Young, innocent’ teen hit during Vancouver shootout dies

15-year-old Coquitlam boy was in a car driving by the scene

Ontario man charged with selling Canadian’s usernames and passwords

Ontario man ran site that peddled billions of pieces of personal data: RCMP

Video: B.C. documentary features Okanagan ice climbing

First documentary for Penticton filmmaker captures elusive Okanagan ice climbing

David Emerson quits lumber talks as legal action begins

Former federal minister served as B.C. softwood trade point man

Singer of the Cranberries dead at 46

Her publicist says Dolores O’Riordan died suddenly Monday in London. The cause of death wasn’t immediately available.

Most Read