Red light cameras will soon catch speeders in B.C. (BCCC)

ROAD SAFETY

B.C. upgrades red light cameras to catch speeders

Province calls move more transparent than photo radar

The province is upgrading red light cameras in an effort to catch speeders on B.C. roads.

It will spend the next several months analyzing crash and speed data at the 140 intersections where it has red light cameras before deciding which ones to equip with vehicle identifying equipment.

According to the province, the move is more transparent than photo radar, which Attorney General David Eby called photo radar a “non starter” at a press conference last summer.

Public Safety Minister Mike Farnworth emphatically denied that the change is a move towards photo radar. He said the change requires a hardware upgrade to the existing cameras, and data collection to measure the problem of people speeding to get through a light that is changing to red.

Once that study is complete, the intersection camera system will be able to issue speeding tickets as well as those for running a red light, Farnworth said. A threshold of excessive speeding will be chosen to trigger the additional ticket, he said.

“What we’re concerned about is people who go through red lights,” Farnworth said. “I’ve been up to an intersection many times and the light will turn yellow, and then one, two, sometimes three cars will go through, and they’re going through the red light.

“And we know that’s where the worst accidents happen, at intersections. That’s where pedestrians get hit far too often.”

The photo radar program ended in 2001 and the province said that the unmarked vans, staffed with two police officers each, issued speeding tickets at “low speeding thresholds” and used up too many police resources.

Four other provinces already use red light cameras: Alberta, Saskatchewan, Manitoba and Quebec.

An Ernst & Young report released last summer said that activating more red light cameras to catch speeders could save ICBC $3 million.

Expanding the program to 240 cameras would net savings of $13.5 million and enabling the cameras to catch those speeding through green lights could save $89 million.

The auto insurer has been under fire in recent months for a projected $1.3 billion deficit.

The report also noted that “proven automated speed enforcement technologies” would create “immediate improvement.”

An analysis of 28 automated speed enforcement studies found an at least 14 per cent reduction in crashes.

The province has not yet responded to a request for comment.

MAP: Red light cameras in B.C.

– with files from Tom Fletcher

Just Posted

North Cowichan celebrates public art for Local Government Awareness Week

North Cowichan is showcasing a piece of public art in Crofton in… Continue reading

VIDEO: SAR reinforcements from up Island arrive Sunday to help search for Ben Kilmer

Family, RCMP ‘extremely happy’ with the search effort so far, search manager tells volunteers

Good Samaritan helps extinguish car fire in Ladysmith

A woman was behind the wheel of a Chevy Impala on a… Continue reading

Is Steve Nash Vancouver Island’s best athlete of all-time?

As Captain Canada gets ready to enter basketball’s Hall of Fame it’s time to debate his legacy

Who is Vancouver Island’s greatest athlete ever?

We want to know, you get to choose in a 64-athlete tournament bracket

Winnipeg’s JP Hoe performs in Ladysmith

Six-time Western Canada Music Award nominee and Winnipeg native JP Hoe performed… Continue reading

Woman’s death near Tofino prompts warning about ‘unpredictable’ ocean

Ann Wittenberg was visiting Tofino for her daughter Victoria Emon’s wedding

Will Taylor Swift’s high concert ticket prices stop scalpers?

Move by artist comes as B.C. looks to how to regulate scalpers and bots reselling concert tickets

36 fires sparked May long weekend, most due to lightning: BC Wildfire

As warmer weather nears, chief fire officer Kevin Skrepnek says too soon to forecast summer

Ariana Grande sends message of hope on anniversary of Manchester bombing

Prince William joins survivors and emergency workers for remembrance service

B.C. flood risk switches from snowmelt to rainfall: River Forecast Centre

Kootenays and Fraser River remain serious concerns

Pipeline more important than premiers meeting: Notley

“Canada has to work for all Canadians, that’s why we’re fighting for the pipeline”

Canadian government spending tens of millions on Facebook ads

From January 2016 to March 2018, feds spent more than $24.4 million on Facebook and Instagram ads

VIDEO: How to use naloxone to stop a fentanyl overdose

ANKORS’ Chloe Sage shows what to do when someone is overdosing

Most Read