Shadow the grizzly eats an apple inside her enclosure at the Greater Vancouver Zoo. (Black Press file photo)

B.C. zoo vows change after report of animals suffering ‘boredom and frustration’

Manager promises upgrades, including a safari park and better accommodation for big cats

Improvements are in the works for the Greater Vancouver Zoo in Aldergrove that will focus on B.C and Canadian wildlife, as well as upgrading facilities for more exotic animals.

That’s according to new zoo general manager Serge Lussier, following a report released Monday (Dec. 30) that said many animals at the zoo were living in “barren, under-sized cages and enclosures that restrict them from engaging in natural behaviours.”

In his response Tuesday (Dec. 31), Lussier told Black Press the zoo has a “comprehensive enrichment program” to promote a “healthy psychology and behavioural ecology.”

“Animal’s lives are enriched on a daily basis through novel items and behavioural conditioning,” Lussier said.

The report by the Vancouver Humane Society was prepared by Zoocheck, a Canadian-based international wildlife protection charity, based on “issues identified during three separate visits.”

It called on the zoo to improve conditions for its animals and to move away from “keeping animals unsuited to B.C.’s climate.”

Lussier said planned improvements to the zoo over the next few years will include a conservation and education centre in 2020, the transformation of half the site into a safari park devoted to B.C. and Canadian wildlife in 2021, a “large feline complex” in 2022, and an African Savannah project in 2023 with an elevated walkway and observatory.

All the changes will help position it as “the zoo of the future,” Lussier predicted.

“The potential for this institution is immense,” Lussier added.

Lussier noted the zoo has twice won the Peter Karsten In-situ conservation award, in 2015, for workng on recovering the endangered western painted turtle and again in 2019 for restoration work completed on the Salmon River’s riparian habitat.

“Our vision remains to be a leader in the conservation efforts of animals and protection of the habitat they live in and will continue to inspire appreciation of our ecosystems and support conservation efforts by engaging our guests and the community,” Lussier said.

In the report, Zoocheck noted there have been improvements since the charity began issuing reports on the Greater Vancouver Zoo beginning in 1997. The zoo seems to have made a number of “significant, very positive, changes” but adding “some longstanding issues remain problematic and should be addressed.”

“They include, but are not limited to, lack of space for certain species, lack of appropriate environmental conditions, lack of environmental and behavioural enrichment, lack of shelter and privacy areas, lack of proper social contexts, excess ground water and water logging of enclosure substrates.”

Vancouver Humane Society spokesperson Peter Fricker said the zoo doesn’t provide animals with a stimulating environment that allows natural activities such as climbing, foraging or digging.

“The main issue is a lack of enrichment,” Fricker said.

Given the amount of space available on the 120-acre site, the zoo should build larger enclosures with more for animals to do, “to alleviate boredom and frustration,” he said.

READ MORE: Greater Vancouver Zoo animals suffer ‘boredom and frustration’ Humane Society says

It is the largest facility of its kind in B.C. and houses more than 140 wild and exotic animals including lions, a tiger, cheetah, giraffe and hippos.

It also contributes to conservation efforts on various fronts including work to build back the population of the spotted frog and the Western painted turtle.

READ ALSO: Zoo awarded for its restoration of the Salmon River

Over the years, the zoo has faced controversy over the untimely death of some giraffes and the treatment of one of its hippos.

An outdoor enclosure was built for the hippo, including a large pond, after the criticism.

There have been protests by animal rights activists at the zoo from time to time.



dan.ferguson@langleyadvancetimes.com

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

BC Liberal candidate Duck Paterson on the campaign trail. (Submitted photo)
BC Liberal candidate Duck Paterson clarifies position on climate change

Paterson calls human activity a ‘contributing’ factor and says climate change must be addressed

Property on the Trans Canada Highway beside the Country Maples Campground has been sold and will become a modular home park. (Photo submitted)
Development, business transactions significant for Chemainus

Two highway properties and Owl’s Nest Bakery and Bistro sold

Chris Istace campaigning in Crofton. (Photo submitted)
Green Party’s Istace apologizes for remark about First Nations gaming grants being a ‘handout’

Candidate determined to do better in thinking and communicating matters of reconciliation

Debby Baker completed her 671km walk in style with a celebration at Eagles Hall in Ladysmith (Submitted photo)
671 kilometres later, Debby Baker raises $5,000 for local charities

Baker travelled the distance from Ladysmith to the Dalles, Oregon – all without leaving the Island

Jenna Forster moderated the Virtual All Candidates Forum between Duck Paterson (top left); Chris Istace (top right); and Doug Routley (Youtube/Ladysmith Chamber of Commerce)
Nanaimo-North Cowichan candidates state their case in virtual debate

Duck Paterson, Chris Istace, and Doug Routley are on the ballot for October 24

Provincial health officer Dr. Bonnie Henry presents modelling of COVID-19 spread in B.C., March 25, 2020. (B.C. government photo)
B.C. sets another COVID-19 record with 203 new cases

up to 1,766 active cases in B.C., two more deaths

Nanaimo RCMP arrest man with axe in downtown park. (File photo)
Man seen with axe at Nanaimo park, numerous RCMP officers respond

Incident happened Friday evening at Maffeo Sutton Park

RCMP. (Phil McLachlan - Black Press Media)
British Columbia man dies during ski trip near glacier west of Calgary

Kananaskis Public Safety and Alpine Helicopters responded around 2:30 p.m.

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau arrives on Parliament Hill in Ottawa on Monday, Oct. 19, 2020, following a week-long break for the House of Commons. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick
One crisis after another for Trudeau since last federal election one year ago

It has been a year of unprecedented calamity and crisis

Members of the Sipekne’katik First Nation load lobster traps on the wharf in Saulnierville, N.S., after launching its own self-regulated fishery on Thursday, Sept. 17, 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Andrew Vaughan
Vancouver Island First Nations back Nova Scotia’s Indigenous lobster fishermen

Nuu-chah-nulth Tribal Council calls for action before lives are lost

Join Black Press Media and Do Some Good

Pay it Forward program supports local businesses in their community giving

Skiers line up to start the Royal LePage Comox Valley Snow to Surf Adventure Relay Race. Photo by Tim Penney
Popular Comox Valley adventure race cancelled for 2021

COVID forces Comox Valley Royal LePage Snow to Surf Adventure Relay Race cancellation again

Rio Tinto Alcan’s aluminum smelter at Kitimat competes against producers in the Middle East and Russia that have no carbon tax. (Rio Tinto)
B.C. carbon tax highest in Canada, export industries unprotected

B.C. NDP, B.C. Liberals say they’re looking at exemptions

Most Read