The changes take effect immediately and expire on July 15, 2020. The timeline is subject to change. (Contributed)

The changes take effect immediately and expire on July 15, 2020. The timeline is subject to change. (Contributed)

B.C. to allow restaurants to hire laid-off servers to deliver alcohol

Restaurants are allowed to use unemployed servers to deliver liquor products

The province of British Columbia is now allowing restaurants to deliver alcohol due to growing COVID-19 concerns.

In an effort to reinforce social distancing orders and help support workers in the restaurant industry, the government of British Columbia is making changes to temporarily allow restaurants to deliver liquor products alongside the purchase of a meal.

“In these extraordinary times, more British Columbians are relying on delivery services during the COVID-19 pandemic,” said David Eby, attorney general.

“Permitting licensed restaurants to hire their out of work servers to deliver liquor products as part of their food-delivery service allows the public to continue to observe social distancing measures and also offers much-needed support to these workers and businesses.”

READ MORE: More than 400 COVID-19 cases, 10 deaths in B.C.

These changes will be made available to customers who purchase a meal and the sealed, packaged liquor product for pick up at the restaurant or for delivery at home. Previously, restaurants were only permitted to sell liquor for consumption in their establishment, unless they had a special endorsement on their license.

People who purchase liquor with their meal must present government-issued identification. In addition, The individuals delivering the liquor products will also be required to be certified with Serving It Right, which government hopes will help encourage businesses to use currently laid-off serving staff to make these deliveries. The staff in licensed establishments are already required to hold this certification.

READ MORE: Hotel Eldorado temporarily shutting doors to help slow COVID-19

These changes come after the restaurant industry has been hit hard by the COVID-19 pandemic. The Business Technical Advisory Panel, which consists of representatives of the liquor and hospitality industry, provided this recommendation to help support struggling hospitality workers and businesses during this time.

“A special thank you to the members of the Business Technical Advisory Panel for their recommendations during this public health emergency that has had such a terrible impact on workers in our favorite bars and restaurants,” said Eby.

“Government is committed to working with hospitality workers and businesses to identify ways to reduce the impact of this crisis.”

The changes take effect immediately and expire on July 15, 2020. The timeline is subject to change.


Daniel Taylor
Reporter, Kelowna Capital News
Email me at daniel.taylor@kelownacapnews.com
Follow me on Twitter

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