BC local elections: Ladysmith town council candidate Tricia McKay

Current occupation- Retired

Background – I am a 30 year resident and homeowner of Ladysmith. My three children graduated from Ladysmith Secondary School and each enjoy a successful career. A little over a year ago, I retired from my 30 year career as a teacher and principal. During that time I also took on a range of other leadership roles including union representative, and president of the NLPS Administrators’ Group.

Why are you running for council? I am running for council because I now have time to give back to the wonderful community of Ladysmith. I believe I have the right skill set to make a positive contribution as the Council moves ahead on existing initiatives and begins to lay the foundation for future initiatives. I am an excellent communicator and compassionate listener. I work effectively with others to create a highly functioning team. I have experience working with the budget process. I demonstrate integrity and an ability to see the bigger picture. I am committed to supporting balanced growth and development to make Ladysmith the best it can be for all ages.

If elected, what will your priorities be for the term and how you will tackle them ? A priority for me would be to address the growing level of taxation in Ladysmith. We need to continue finding ways to create partnerships and seek grants that will lessen the burden on the taxpayer. During my term I would like to focus on finding ways to expand our tax base so families can better afford home ownership and the town can continue to thrive.

Working closely with the Ladysmith Resource Centre to further their ongoing efforts to provide affordable housing is another priority for me. The need for affordable housing goes well beyond our town and I am optimistic the provincial and federal governments will also make this a priority.

The final priority for me as a member of the Council will be to ensure we are addressing the services that support everyone. The basics, like sewer, water and roads are not glitzy or glamourous but they are essential for the health and safety of our town. Aging infrastructures must be upgraded and expanded if the growth of our town is to be positive and progressive.

What’s the best path forward for growth on the waterfront? From what I have read, seen and discussed I am excited to see Ladysmith finally ready to develop this amazing resource. The work done in recent years by our current town leaders has resulted in a The Waterfront Area Plan calls for a mixed use balanced development of residential, commercial, recreation and cultural. In my mind, our existing “Jewel of Ladysmith” is Transfer Beach Park. It is a beautiful example of what this town can do. Imagine what the rest of our waterfront can be like with continued expert planning, focused on balanced land use, environmental stewardship and expanded commercial opportunities. I am excited about the opportunity to participate in the development of our waterfront area.

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