A bear in a back yard in Maple Ridge. (THE NEWS files)

Wounded bear killed by conservation officers after returning to B.C. subdivision

Officers first shot bear in May, but it ran into wooded area of Maple Ridge.

A bear that had been injured when a conservation officer shot it last month returned to a Maple Ridge subdivision and was killed on Wednesday.

On May 15, a brown-coloured black bear was shot on Foreman Drive. It had been reported going into garages in the Silver Valley neighbourhood, approaching people, and was not “hazed off” even when a resident activated a car alarm to try and scare it away.

Once shot with a high-powered rifle, the bear ran into the wooded area north of Foreman Dr. Conservation officers tracked the bear, but could not locate it.

Sgt. Todd Hunter of the Conservation Officer Service said there were several reports that the bear was back, and again exhibiting behaviours that resulted in it being determined a danger to the public.

“It was still presenting itself as a public safety threat,” said Hunter.

Officers shot the animal again Wednesday.

“This time, they did it professionally and successfully.”

He said shooting live game is not an exact science, and conservation officers always regret injuring an animal when it happens.

“Something like that always has an impact,” added.

READ ALSO: Can’t kill bears for eating honey

While officers have now put down four bears this spring that were a threat to the public, Hunter noted there are still problems with homeowners not eliminating attractants such as garbage.

WildsafeBC was in a Silver Valley park on Sunday trying create more awareness of wildlife-human conflicts.

Maple Ridge has been significantly busier with bear complaints that in recent years, Hunter said.


 


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