Blue Monday isn’t real, but the Canadian Mental Health Association says seasonal affective disorder and the winter blues are. (Unsplash image - Gabriele Diwald)

Blue Monday is a myth but seasonal affective disorder and the winter blues are real

Canadian Mental Health Association says weather can affect mood

If you find yourself feeling down on Jan. 20, you might be experiencing Blue Monday.

The third Monday of the year is what some also consider the most depressing day of the year, but according to the Canadian Mental Health Association (CMHA), Blue Monday is a myth.

The CMHA website says the dark day was actually a marketing strategy used to encourage people to go on vacation in January.

However, the national mental health organization says seasonal affective disorder and the “winter blues” are very real.

“As days get shorter, darker and colder, it’s quite common to notice a shift in mood,” the CMHA website says.

READ ALSO: Does the season make you blue? It could be SAD

In Canada, about five per cent of the population is affected by seasonal affective disorder, which can manifest as changes in energy, appetite and overall mood.

The “winter blues” which affect as many as 15 per cent of people in Canada, are considered to be a milder form of seasonal affective disorder. They are a wave of low emotions that accompany the darker, colder days of the winter season.

Those experiencing winter blues might feel the need to sleep longer, eat more comfort food and spend more time alone rather than with friends and family.

While the winter season is unavoidable, lifestyle changes like getting some daylight, exercising regularly and eating a well-balanced diet are recommended to help battle the winter blues.

READ ALSO: Shortened daylight in B.C. can put damper on mental health

Keeping a normal sleep schedule and being kind to yourself by checking in regularly and spending some time on self-care are also helpful.

The CMHA says treatment for seasonal affective disorder can also include light therapy, counselling, medication or a combination of the three.

“Its important to note that lifestyle changes aren’t always sufficient to beat the winter blues or SAD, and that you can always reach out for supports and services,” the CMHA says. “Treatments are available to help you cope, such as counselling and light therapy.”

Those seeking mental health resources can find some on the province’s website as well as on Island Health’s website.

shalu.mehta@blackpress.ca


Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Comments are closed

Just Posted

Town of Ladysmith receives $3.3 million grant for Arts & Heritage Hub

The funds will go to creating artist studios around the Machine Shop and maintaining heritage assets

Extension given for Cowichan region homeless tenting sites

Meeting with BC Housing to determine the next step

B.C. Supreme Court dismisses claim against Island Corridor Foundation

Snaw-Naw-As (Nanoose) First Nation was seeking return of reserve land as railway sits unused

What’s in a name? Ladysmith’s historical streets re-examined

Several streets in downtown Ladysmith are named after generals that served in the Boer War

Archie’s lets the good times roll

Blast from the past at new diner in the Chemainus Public Market

Horrifying video shows near head-on collision on Trans Canada

The video was captured on dash cam along Highway 1

Facing changes together: Your community, your journalists

We’re asking you to lock arms with us, as we look to better days ahead

UPDATE: Vancouver Island skydiving community mourns loss of one of its own

James Smith, 34, of Victoria, dies in Nanoose Bay incident

Elizabeth May endorses Furstenau in BC Greens race

Former federal party leader backs Cowichan Valley MLA

Fraser Valley woman complains of violent RCMP takedown during wellness check

Mounties respond that she was not co-operating during Mental Health Act apprehension

B.C. sees 12 new COVID-19 cases, no new deaths

Three outbreaks exist in health-care settings

Lost dog swims Columbia River multiple times searching for home

The dog was missing from his Castlegar home for three days.

COVID-19: B.C. promotes video-activated services card

Mobile app allows easier video identity verification

ICBC to resume road tests in July with priority for rebookings, health-care workers

Tests have been on hold for four months due to COVID-19

Most Read