(rick/Flickr)

Canadian millennials expect to live better than parents in retirement: study

Study questions ‘unrealistic expectations’ of young Canadians

An new study released Monday shows a disconnect between millennials’ financial realities and retirement expectations.

The study, conducted by Angus Reid Institute, finds one-in-three Canadians (32 per cent) have put off saving for retirement because of their debt. Millions more – especially those under the age of 40 – have put off buying a home (18 per cent), getting married (8 per cent), having children (7 per cent) or moving out of their parents’ homes (5 per cent).

Millennial Money: Don’t let Instagram envy get you into debt

Despite relatively few young Canadians reporting job stability or having more than $25,000 saved, they seem to be looking toward retirement with surprising optimism, the study found.

Young people are more likely to view their debt as significant and – though they mostly feel this debt is manageable – more than four-in-ten Canadians ages 26-37 say they have put off saving for retirement because of it.

At the same time, on average the youngest Canadians expect to retire earlier and live better in retirement compared to their elders.

Roughly one-third of older Canadians expect to struggle to make ends meet during retirement, and anticipate relying on funds from the government or work pensions.

Meanwhile, younger Canadians are more likely to expect to use personal retirement savings to do everything they want after concluding their careers.

“How young Canadians plan to achieve this expected level of comfort in retirement is an open question,” the study said.

Overall, the study found more than three-quarters of Canadians are carrying debt.

For every dollar of disposable income, Canadians reported owing about $1.78 to creditors, for a collective total of more than $2 trillion.

The study suggests this debt is causing notable financial strain for more than four-in-ten people in the country.

Just 12 per cent of Canadians said they have an amount in the bank that meets or exceeds their personal goal.



karissa.gall@blackpress.ca

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter

Just Posted

Lack of consultation on Chemainus Road corridor project irks business owners, residents

Surprise expressed over change to anticipated North Cowichan plans

Fuller Lake Beach remains closed

High bacteria count prevents people from being in the water during warm summer days

Wildlife photographer Boomer Jerritt will host Ladysmith lecture

Fresh off a trip to Churchill, Manitoba, Jerritt will speak on how climate change affects the arctic

Get ready for the 16th annual Ladysmith Show ‘n’ Shine

The show will feature cars from the past, as well as modern day marvels

Excavators help cute kid who copied their dig with his toys stay “safe at work”

Carson Carnegie wakes up at 7:00 am every morning to watch construction work on his street

QUIZ: How much do you remember about Woodstock?

Weekend music festival in Bethel, New York, was held 50 years ago

U16 B.C. fastpitch team named national champs

Girls went undefeated at national tournament in Calgary

Advocates ‘internationalize’ the fight to free Raif Badawi from Saudi prison

Raif Badawi was arrested on June 17, 2012, and was later sentenced to 1,000 lashes and 10 years in jail for his online criticism of Saudi clerics

Canadian entrepreneurs turning beer byproduct into bread, cookies and profits

Some breweries turn to entrepreneurs looking to turn spent grain into treats for people and their pets

Canada ‘disappointed’ terror suspect’s British citizenship revoked

Jack Letts, who was dubbed “Jihadi Jack” by the U.K. media, has been detained in a Kurdish prison for about two years

Chrystia Freeland condemns violence in Hong Kong, backs right to peaceful assembly

There have been months of protests in the semi-autonomous region

Most Read