The Canadian Securities Administrators says crypto-trading platforms don’t necessarily fit the existing regulatory structure because some of their functions are similar to regulated exchanges but other functions are similar to dealers, custodians and clearing agencies.

Canadian regulators eye framework to cover crypto trading platforms

Regulators invite interested parties to submit written comments

The regulatory bodies that oversee Canada’s stock markets are seeking feedback on appropriate requirements for platforms that trade cryptocurrencies such as Bitcoin, Ethereum and Ripple.

The provincial regulators represented by the Canadian Securities Administrators and the Investment Industry Regulatory Organization of Canada published their proposed framework on Thursday.

READ MORE: Search into missing cryptocurrency from B.C.-based exchange turns up empty ‘cold wallets:’ Report

The CSA says crypto-trading platforms don’t necessarily fit the existing regulatory structure because some of their functions are similar to regulated exchanges but other functions are similar to dealers, custodians and clearing agencies.

The consultation paper invites interested parties to submit written comments on a variety of questions by May 15. The responses will help the regulators as they craft a new framework for crypto-trading platforms.

Among other things, the paper asks in its section on surveillance of trading activities if it’s appropriate for the platforms to set rules and monitor trading activities on their own marketplace.

The paper also asks what standards should be in place to limit the risk of crypto assets being lost or stolen and what type of insurance coverage the platforms should be required to obtain.

The Canadian Press

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