‘Epic sky palace’: B.C. businesses help create dream treehouse for boy recovering from cancer

The completed treehouse on Mayne Island built by a handful of Parksville businesses as part of a Children’s Wish initiative for eleven-year old Kai Hennessey. (Courtesy of Kevin Hennessey)The completed treehouse on Mayne Island built by a handful of Parksville businesses as part of a Children’s Wish initiative for eleven-year old Kai Hennessey. (Courtesy of Kevin Hennessey)
Brandon Ford, Ryan Smythe, Ritchie Rae and Kyle Meston stand behind Kai in his newly-built treehouse on Mayne Island. (Courtesy of Kevin Hennessey)Brandon Ford, Ryan Smythe, Ritchie Rae and Kyle Meston stand behind Kai in his newly-built treehouse on Mayne Island. (Courtesy of Kevin Hennessey)

Eleven-year-old Kai Hennessey is “over the moon” about his new treehouse.

After a long struggle with cancer at a very young age, the Children’s Wish foundation offered him and his family the opportunity to have a wish granted.

Kai asked for a treehouse at his family’s property on Mayne Island.

His parents weren’t sure that would be something the organization could grant, but it quickly became something beyond their wildest dreams. It’s a little bit more high-tech than your average treehouse – with electricity, heat and a loft with a king-sized bed, the space could rival some apartments on the market.

Brandon Ford is the store manager at Albertsons Home Centre in Parksville. He said that the Children’s Wish foundation reached out to him to see if he’d be interested in granting Kai’s wish.

Ford was, and teamed up with Jordan Almond of MKM Projects, and a number of other businesses and individuals in the Parksville area.

“It’s pretty cool. It all stemmed out of a little contact and next thing you know, it was coming to life,” said Ford.

Kai’s dad Kevin Hennessey says that their family still can’t quite believe the scope of the project.

READ MORE: Parksville woman cycles Island to raise awareness for rare cancer

“It’s amazing. It’s incredible. We couldn’t even describe it with words when it was getting built, because they just kept making it more and more awesome. We envisioned it being like a little kid’s treehouse, and it turned into this epic sky palace. My son’s a little bit over the moon about it,” said Hennessey.

“We’re still kind of in a daze like, is this really happening?”

Albertson’s donated all the material, MKM covered the construction costs, and Aurora Roofing supplied the roofing, so they were able to completely fund the project.

“We were able to tell Children’s Wish that not only would we look after the construction, but they could take the money that they had set aside to grant Kai’s wish and they could put it towards another kid, and we would just completely fund and construct the build,” said Ford.

“A lot of this was local people and local businesses stepping up to help grant this treehouse. It went a little bit further than your regular treehouse. If we were to build this treehouse if a customer asked us to do it, it would be like a $35,000 bill. It was pretty surreal.”

Hennessey says that to their family, Ford and Almond are superheroes.

“Brandon and Jordan aren’t just awesome because of the treehouse. They’re also awesome because they were part of Kai’s dream team, helped us raise money, they’re just superheroes. Absolute superheroes,” said Hennessey.

All the Children’s Wish participants gathered at B.C. Place for an Olympic-games style fundraiser. Ford and Almond were on board all the way, travelling to Vancouver with the family to help them fundraise.

“It was unbelievable, just coming out on stage and seeing the jumbotron with all of our kids’ names on them and stuff, and their pictures. We had the smallest team, but we kicked butt. Jordan and Brandon just rocked it – we ended up raising almost $15,000 for Children’s Wish,” said Hennessey.

READ MORE: 9-year-old Parksville cancer victim helped by classmates

Things are looking up for Kai and his family. Around the time the treehouse build started, Kai received the news that he was five years clear of cancer.

“It’s incredible. It was kind of a bright shining beacon at the end of a horrible dark tunnel. It was incredible, like the perfect topper for everything,” said Hennessey.

Hennessey says his son is looking forward to hosting friends for sleepovers and gaming marathons. They plan on decking the space out with bean bag chairs, posters, a board game table and a gaming corner.

Ford also thanked companies Westwood Metals, Complete Windows, Harold Engineering, Kebouw Cranes, Osprey Electric and La-Z-Boy, and individuals Richie Rae, Kyle Meston, Ryan Smythe, Matt Wiebe, Brett Walker and Jeff Codell.

“It was amazing, seeing the smile on Kai’s face … These kids have faced so much, and dealt through so much in such a short period of time of life. With the average wish, you’re changing things for a day. You’re letting them go be a kid for a day, or a week family vacation. This treehouse is something that Kai’s going to use for a long time. It’s his little hideaway, it’s his place to go and be a kid,” said Ford.

emily.vance@pqbnews.com

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter 

CancercharityfundraiserParksville

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

Bruce Whittington making a founding gift to the Ladysmith Community Foundation Fund, presented to then Nanaimo Foundation Board Chair, Ted Carson. (Submitted photo)
New Ladysmith Community Fund set up to support local charities

The fund will be managed by the Nanaimo Foundation and all funds will remain in Ladysmith

B.C. Centre for Disease Control maps showing new COVID-19 cases by local health area for the week of April 4-10. (BCCDC image)
Parksville-Qualicum passes Nanaimo in new COVID-19 cases

Greater Victoria had more new cases than any other Island area: B.C. Centre for Disease Control

‘For Sale’ signs quickly turned to ‘Sold’ signs as record-high demand for housing meets record-low inventory. (Cole Schisler photo)
Multiple offers and unconditional sales rampant in Ladysmith housing market

Vancouver Island Real Estate Board Zone 3 director Susan Perrey says the market is ‘crazy all around’

From left to right: Vicki Barta, Bruce Ormond, Greg Heide, Gord McInnis, and Charles Harman rehearse via zoom for the upcoming radio play, “Visitor from Planet Zoltan”. (Submitted photo)
Radio plays prove successful for Ladysmith Little Theatre, four more in production

Ladysmith Little Theatre pivoted to producing radio plays during the pandemic

Two men were seen removing red dresses alongside the Island Highway in Oyster Bay. (Submitted photo)
Two men filmed removing red dresses from trees in Oyster Bay

Activists hung the dresses to raise awareness for Vancouver Island Murdered/Missing Women & Girls

Rainbow trouts thrashing with life as they’re about to be transferred to the largest lake of their lives, even though it’s pretty small. These rainbows have a blue tinge because they matched the blue of their hatchery pen, but soon they’ll take on the green-browns of their new home at Lookout Lake. (Zoe Ducklow/News Staff)
VIDEO: B.C. lake stocked with hatchery trout to delight of a seniors fishing club

The Cherish Trout Scouts made plans to come back fishing soon

For Leela Harrop, the recent death of her brother Raju Tiwari pushed her to sign up for the vaccine. Photo supplied
Island woman on fence about vaccine prompted by brother’s death

Leela Harrop of Comox says she did have issues with signing up online this past week

Royal Inland Hospital in Kamloops. (Dave Eagles/Kamloops This Week file photo)
RCMP intercept vehicle fleeing with infant taken from Kamloops hospital

The baby was at the hospital receiving life-saving care

Vancouver Police Const. Deepak Sood is under review by the Independent Investigations Office of B.C. after making comments to a harm reduction advocate Sunday, April 11. (Screen grab)
VIDEO: Vancouver officer convicted of uttering threats under watchdog review again

Const. Deepak Sood was recorded Sunday saying ‘I’ll smack you’ and ‘go back to selling drugs’ to a harm reduction advocate

Provincial health officer Dr. Bonnie Henry prepares a daily update on the coronavirus pandemic, April 21, 2020. (B.C. Government)
B.C.’s COVID-19 infection rate persists, 1,005 new cases Friday

Hospitalization up to 425, six more virus-related deaths

Premier John Horgan receives a dose of the AstraZeneca COVID-19 vaccine at the pharmacy in James Bay Thrifty’s Foods in Victoria, B.C., on Friday, April 16, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Chad Hipolito
B.C. Premier John Horgan gets AstraZeneca shot, encourages others

27% of residents in B.C. have now been vaccinated against COVID-19

The Nautical Dog Cafe at Skaha marina is getting its patio ready in hopes Mother Nature will provide where provincial restrictions have taken away indoor dining. (Facebook)
‘A lot of instability’: B.C. restaurants in layoff limbo

As COVID-19 cases stay high, restaurants in British Columbia are closed to indoor dining

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau looks on as Deputy Prime Minister and Finance Minister Chrystia Freeland responds to a question during a news conference on Parliament Hill in Ottawa, Tuesday, Aug. 18, 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian Wyld
Expectations high as Trudeau Liberals get ready to unveil first pandemic budget

The Liberals will look to thread an economic needle with Monday’s budget

John Furlong, Own The Podium board chairman and former CEO of the Vancouver Olympics, addresses a Vancouver Board of Trade luncheon in Vancouver, B.C., on Wednesday November 25, 2015.THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck
John Furlong presents 2030 Winter Games vision to Vancouver Board of Trade

Vancouver and Whistler would remain among host sites because of 2010 sport venues still operational

Most Read