Keep on trucking — as a career choice, that is

Trucking companies throughout B.C. and in our region require professional drivers, mechanics, dispatchers and operations staff.

Job seekers are in luck when it comes to the commercial road transportation industry in British Columbia.

Trucking companies throughout B.C. require professional drivers, mechanics, dispatchers and operations staff right now, which means that job seekers with experience and/or training may find work within their preferred region.

For those considering training prior to joining the workforce, demand for skilled workers in the industry is likely to grow — to 2020 and beyond.

There are a number of reasons for this. For truck drivers, the industry is facing a North America-wide shortage because most are 45 years of age or older and nearing retirement (in fact, in Canada, according to a report by the Canada Trucking Human Resources Council, 58 per cent of long-haul truck drivers fall in this age range).

Similar shortages exist for other jobs, including diesel engine and heavy duty mechanics.

Aside from worker shortages, economic growth in the Asia-Pacific Gateway is also driving demand for workers in transportation. This applies not only to companies in the Lower Mainland, but in other regions as well, since the Asia-Pacific “Gateway” is actually made up of an integrated supply chain of airports, seaports, rail and road connections, and border crossings, from Prince Rupert to Surrey, with links supplied by trucking.

Today’s trucking industry is an exciting place to be.

Equipment in many companies is state of the art, meaning increased comfort and ease for drivers and opportunities for mechanics to work with technologically advanced systems, keeping both their skills and interest engaged. Dispatch relies on sophisticated tracking and routing systems. Others on the operations side also use information technology of many kinds to deal with everything from licences and permits to customer services, accounting, sales and marketing.

And, people joining the industry have many career choices.

Drivers, for example, may work close to home as pick up and delivery or short-haul drivers. Those who like the idea of travelling across Canada or North America can become long-haul drivers for an employer or work as owner-operators. Drivers may haul consumer goods, fuel, logs, heavy-duty equipment, livestock — most of what we purchase or consume spent some time on the road with a commercial truck!

If you already have experience as a driver, mechanic or operations worker, most companies advertise jobs on their websites. Members of the BC Trucking Association from across the province may post jobs under Careers on the BC Trucking Association website, and the provincial and federal governments maintain job sites at WorkBC and Working in Canada.

Locally, it may also pay to approach a company you’d like to work for, drop off a resumé and inquire if and when they’ll be hiring.

If you’d like to enter the industry but need training, there are also many avenues to explore.

Although there is not a standard training course for professional drivers, there are numerous private schools throughout B.C. that offer programs.

For information on transportation trades in B.C., including mechanics and other technicians, visit transCDA (www.tcda.ca/home). And for information on trucking careers in general, see www.truckingcareers.ca.

Your own community and region depend on trucking. It may also offer the right career for you.

A quick search for trucking companies in the Ladysmith area comes up with a number of leads.

Check the Yellow Pages, and you’ll find Coastal Trucking, Island Pacific Transport Ltd., H A Davis Trucking Ltd. and Ryler Bulk Carriers Inc. right in Ladysmith.

You’ll find Granby Bobcat Service Ltd.on Chemainus Road, along with MSJ Transport Ltd., Nicholson Ventures Ltd. and Ray Peters Trucking in Chemainus, and you will also come up with Connect Transport Ltd. and Graf Excavating Co. Ltd. in Cassidy.

An Internet search also guides you to Dudeck Truck and Crane Ltd. in Yellow Point.

And those are only some of the options that come up when you search strictly for trucking. There are tons of possibilities.

— Black Press

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