In this courtroom sketch, Meng Wanzhou, right, the chief financial officer of Huawei Technologies, sits beside a translator during a bail hearing at British Columbia Supreme Court in Vancouver, on Friday, Dec. 7, 2018. Meng faces extradition to the U.S. on charges of trying to evade U.S. sanctions on Iran. She appeared in a Vancouver court Friday to seek bail. (Jane Wolsak/The Canadian Press via AP)

Lawyer for Chinese exec detained by Canada says it’s ‘inconceivable’ she would flee

Meng Wanzhou was detained at the request of the U.S. during a layover at the Vancouver airport

The lawyer for a top Chinese executive who faces fraud charges in the U.S. says it would be inconceivable she would flee because she would not embarrass her father or the enormous company she has helped build.

Monday is the second day of a hearing on whether to release Meng on bail in Canada. Meng Wanzhou is the chief financial officer of telecommunications giant Huawei and also the daughter of its founder.

Her lawyer David Martin says Meng’s husband will put up both of their Vancouver homes plus $1 million Canadian (US$750,000) for a total value of $15 million Canadian ($11.2 million) as collateral.

READ MORE: Break-in at home of detained Chinese Huawei executive

She was detained at the request of the U.S. during a layover at the Vancouver airport on Dec. 1. The U.S. alleges that Huawei used a Hong Kong shell company to sell equipment in Iran in violation of U.S. sanctions. It also says that Meng and Huawei misled American banks about its business dealings in Iran.

Martin called to the stand a representative from a surveillance company. Martin says Meng would cover the expenses of the company and says the surveillance company will arrest her if she tries to flee.

China formally protested the arrest to the ambassadors of Canada and the United States over the weekend.

The country says there is no evidence to back up claims in the West that Huawei and other Chinese tech companies pose a security threat.

READ MORE: China says Canada’s detention of Huawei exec ‘vile in nature’

Foreign Ministry spokesman Lu Kang said Monday that other countries are hyping up security threats to create obstacles for Chinese companies trying to do legitimate business.

His comments come shortly before Huawei executive Meng Wanzhou was due in court in Canada for a resumption of her bail hearing.

The U.S. alleges Huawei used a Hong Kong shell company to evade U.S. trade curbs on Iran and wants Meng extradited. She was detained on Dec. 1 while changing planes in Vancouver.

READ MORE: B.C. suspends Chinese portion of Asian forestry trade mission due to Huawei arrest

The Associated Press


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