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No hope for labour settlement in 1913 — Chronicles From The Past

Ed Nicholson of the Ladysmith Historical Society shares the news from 1913, 1938 and 1963.

July 1913

From the front page of the July 5, 1913, Ladysmith Chronicle:

“Mr. and Mrs. David Page, of Oyster Harbour, paid their first visit to Nanaimo in 23 years, the worthy old couple being on their return journey from visiting friends in North Vancouver. David is 77 years old, and his helpmate possesses about the same number of summers. The two of them made their way to Philpot’s [Restaurant], the latter having purchased oysters from Mr. Page for 14 years.

“Mr. Page was the first to open out the oyster business from which Oyster Harbour, now Ladysmith, came into existence. Needless to say, Mr. and Mrs. Page found many changes in Nanaimo after nearly a quarter of a century absence, notably the growth of numerous fine business establishments.”

The Chronicle headline for July 19 read “No Hope of Settlement.”

After spending nine days investigating the dispute between the mine owners and the miners on Vancouver Island, Thomas Crothers, Minister of Labour, returned to Victoria on the morning train. Mr. Crothers had lengthy conferences with the men affected by the “unsettled condition of Labour,” but was unable to find a solution.

June 1938

The 1938 film Rebecca of Sunnybrook Farm — featuring child star Shirley Temple — was on screen in Ladysmith in early July.

This hugely successful movie was held over and played to sold-out audiences. Apparently, children and adults could be heard whistling and singing “The Good Ship Lollipop” and “Animal Crackers in My Soup” as they strolled down First Avenue.

Local residents were also excited about the opening of the Lions Gate Bridge (officially known as the “First Narrows Bridge”) linking Vancouver with the North Shore. A special C.P.R. excursion to Vancouver was arranged for local residents. The trip culminated with a viewing from Prospect Point of the C.P. steamship, Empress of Japan, sailing out of Vancouver Harbour under the newly constructed bridge.

June 1963

The popular television program Reach for the Top ended the season with a special one-hour final match between teams from Victoria and Island South. After a hard-fought and exciting competition, Victoria emerged the winner by a score of 600 to 515.

The Island South runners up were Trygyve Hoy and Philip Lambert from Chemainus and Tom Aussenegg, Stephen Wallace and spare Margaret Jackson from Ladysmith. The final contest was the culmination of a series of weekly competitions involving 102 schools in British Columbia.

Compiled by Ed Nicholson, Ladysmith Historical Society

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