VIDEO: This is what buying legal pot in B.C. looks like

VIDEO: This is what buying legal pot in B.C. looks like

Take a look inside B.C.’s first and only legal pot shop located in Kamloops

Bright, open, with clear finishings and a distinct West Coast design.

That is what the inside of B.C.’s only cannabis retail shop looks like.

Located in Kamloops, the provincial government has hired 20 staff to help operate the storefront. Each is trained to guide cannabis consumers from being I.D’d at the door and into a retail outlet where everything from premium bud, rolled joints and bongs can be purchased.

Cannabis director of retail operations Kevin Satterfield says there will be 92 different products on the floor for display, not including the cannabis accessories.

“We are working with our producers to make sure we have a good product knowledge, that we have the information we are looking for and we have it on a good positive display format where customers can take a look at it through a magnified glass and they can take it, remove it, and smell it,” explained Satterfield.

Prices for cannabis range anywhere from $6.99 for one gram to $86.99 for a seven gram item. Bongs, pipes and paraphernalia can also be purchased and will be on display behind glass.

Trained cannabis consultants will greet consumers and help them make an informed decision on purchasing and consumption.

According to Michael Tan the executive director of cannabis operations, government’s research shows that despite high consumption rates of cannabis in the province, general knowledge of the product is relatively low.

“There was an opportunity to educate customers, particularly new customers, on the plant,” he said.

Cannabis 101 at the BC Cannabis Store starts with understanding the risks and what customers need to know before they buy. The second step focuses on plant anatomy and understanding what is cannabis.

Tan explained there are three basic attributes that the government believes customers should consider when making a decision on what kind of product they want.

“One is the type of plant, indica, sativa, hybrid. Two is the potency levels from a THC and CDB perspective and (third) turbines, not any one of those attributes are indicative of an experience but all three combined would make an educated choice.”

As each cannabis experience differs based on the user, Tan explains that having trained consultants on board will help ease the process of choosing the right product for the consumer.

RELATED: Mellow opening to B.C.’s only legal pot shop

Products are broken down into four basic categories; indica dominant, generally known for its relaxing qualities; sativa dominant, generally known for its uplift; hybrid balance which is a combinations of indica and sativa qualities; CBD, known for its relaxation affect without an intoxicating high.

The other message the government wants to get across inside the store is that of social responsibility. Signs plaster the walls with four messages, keep weed away from children, don’t drive high, possession limits and ‘start low, go slow’.

The BC Cannabis Store is currently working with 40 producers but not all are supplying product.

Blain Lawson, the CEO of the liquor distribution branch, says they bought everything that was available to them at the time.

“They (the producers) are not struggling with the cultivation of the product but with the actual packaging, shipping, and getting it to us,” he said.

“I think in time they will sort that out, time will tell in the next little while if we have enough for the next month, two months, whatever. I believe we do, but that could change.”

RELATED: Puff, puff, pass: Cannabis is officially legal across Canada

With the legalization of marijuana change to the cannabis industry is on the way, but it can’t come soon enough for Kamloops business owner Chris Monteleone.

Currently the co-owner of Commodore Grand Cafe and Lounge, the Kamloops local hopes to open a legal pot shop.

“It’s truly years of research and finding out what was going to be coming,” said Monteleone from outside the store.

“Once legalization was around the corner a location was first, that was in the proper zoning, then a very interesting and intrusive process through the federal government. Then we were approved and referred to the City of Kamloops and that is where we are at now.”

Monteleone and his business partners will go before city council on Oct. 30 with the hope of becoming the second cannabis store in Kamloops, providing some retail competition for the government run location.


@Jen_zee
jen.zielinski@bpdigital.ca

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Cannabis Legislation

 

VIDEO: This is what buying legal pot in B.C. looks like

Just Posted

More and more graffiti has appeared in Ladysmith’s downtown core during the pandemic. (Cole Schisler photo)
Council creates rebate program to encourage graffiti clean up

Property owners can receive up to $50 to help fund graffiti removal

Rick Ruppenthal of Saltair will host a 12-hour talk-a-thon Friday, June 18 over Facebook live. (Photo submitted)
Talk-a-thon to focus on men’s mental health issues

Saltair man spearheading a campaign to generate more conversation during fundraiser

(File photo)
Poverty reduction survey identifies 10 poverty themes

Poverty reduction plan will be finalized in July 2021

Nanaimo-Ladysmith MP Paul Manly says he has no intentions of leaving the Green Party. (House of Commons image)
Island Green MPs have “no intention” of leaving the party after ‘heartbreaking’ departure

Manly, May only remaining Green MPs after Jenica Atwin left for the Liberals over internal disputes

Maxwell Johnson is seen in Bella Bella, B.C., in an undated photo. The Indigenous man from British Columbia has filed complaints with the B.C. Human Rights Tribunal and the Canadian Human Rights Commission after he and his granddaughter were handcuffed when they tried to open a bank account. THE CANADIAN PRESS/HO-Heiltsuk Nation, Damien Gillis, *MANDATORY CREDIT*
VIDEO: Chiefs join human rights case of Indigenous man handcuffed by police in B.C. bank

Maxwell Johnson said he wants change, not just words, from Vancouver police

An inmate in solitary confinement given lunch on Tuesday, May 10, 2016. THE CANADIAN/Lars Hagberg
22-hour cap on solitary confinement for youth in custody still too long: B.C. lawyer

Jennifer Metcalfe was horrified to hear a youth had spent a total of 78 straight days in isolation

Flowers and candles were laid on the driveway of the Weber home, where Kerri Weber was found dead in November 2020. (Black Press Media file photo)
Greater Victoria man to stand trial for death of his wife last November

Ken Weber is charged with second-degree murder of his wife, Kerri Weber

The discovery of a missing woman’s body in Nanaimo earlier this month is now being treated as homicide, say Nanaimo RCMP. (File photo)
Discovery of woman’s body in downtown Nanaimo now being investigated as a homicide

Amy Watts was found dead near Albert Street and Victoria Crescent on June 3

People line up to get their COVID-19 vaccine at a vaccination centre, Thursday, June 10, 2021 in Montreal. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Ryan Remiorz
Vaccines, low COVID case counts increase Father’s Day hope, but risk is still there

Expert says people will have to do their own risk calculus before popping in on Papa

B.C. Premier John Horgan listens as Finance Minister Selina Robinson presents the province’s latest budget, April 20, 2021. The budget projects $19 billion in deficits over three years. (Hansard TV)
B.C. government budget balloons, beyond COVID-19 response

Provincial payroll up 104,000 positions, $10 billion since 2017

Ocean debris is shown on Long Beach in Tofino, B.C. on April, 18, 2012. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward
Shoreline cleanup finds COVID-related trash increased during height of the pandemic

Great Canadian Shoreline Cleanup reports litter from single-use food packaging nearly doubled

Doctor David Vallejo and his fiancee Doctor Mavelin Bonilla hold photos of themselves working, as they kiss at their home in Quito, Ecuador, Wednesday, June 9, 2021. Doctor Vallejo and Doctor Bonilla suspended their wedding in order to tend to COVID-19 patients and in the process Vallejo got sick himself with the disease, ending up in an ICU for several days. (AP Photo/Dolores Ochoa)
Love, sacrifice and surviving COVID-19: one couple’s story

COVID hits Ecuadorian doctors who delayed wedding to treat sick

The Tsow-Tun Le Lum Society, which has been operating a treatment centre on land leased from the Nanoose First Nation for 35 years (pictured), has begun a fundraising campaign to open a new centre near Duncan. (Tsow-Tun Le Lum Society photo)
New residential school healing centre to be built near Duncan

$5-million Indigenous treatment centre will help survivors of residential schools heal

Most Read