(Evgeny Tchebotarev/Pexels)

(Evgeny Tchebotarev/Pexels)

Vancouver woman must pay $1,110 after dog bolts from elevator and bites Shiba Inu

Tribunal member ruled that vet bills, prior propensity to violent behaviour established evidence

A Vancouver woman must pay $1,120 after B.C.’s Civil Resolution Tribunal ruled she was liable for her dog biting another.

At the heart of the issue are two dogs whose owners live in the same condo building.

Alan Rockett said he and his Shiba Inu, Joshua, were waiting for the second-floor elevator at around 6 p.m on Dec. 17, 2018. When the door opened, Rockett claimed Jenny Forst’s dog, Dudley, “came bolting out” and nipped Joshua twice in the stomach.

Rockett said the other dog was on an extendable leash that Forst did not control, and that he got out of his collar. Rockett also said he kicked the other dog and then took Joshua down the stairs.

Forst denied the attack, according to tribunal documents. Her version of events is that Rockett and his dog were blocking her from exiting the elevator and that her dog slipped out of his collar and ran away, but did not bite.

Rockett submitted receipts for two veterinary clinic visits, one for $398.69 and one for $546.77, from the day after the incident. He said his dog was still doing poorly the morning after, and later needed emergency surgery when his condition got worse.

Rockett reported the dog bite to the city’s animal service department, which ticketed Forst.

In her judgment, tribunal member Sarah Orr said she saw more evidence for Rockett’s order of events, and that his description of his dog’s injuries seemed accurate, based on the veterinary receipts he submitted.

Orr also noted Forst’s dog’s history of biting, citing documents from Rockett that show Forst was ticketed and fined $850 for incident in March 14, 2015 when her dog bit Rockett’s partner.

Forst attempted to discredit the 2015 ticket because Rockett and his partner worked for the city, but Orr said she did not find any proof of bias.

Rockett was able to prove that Forst’s dog’s had a “propensity to bite,” she ruled, and so Forst must pay him $1,120.40 for vet bills, pre-judgment interest and tribunal fees.

ALSO READ: B.C. woman ordered to return dog to ex-boyfriend for $2,000

ALSO READ: B.C. woman must pay $1,000 after unleashed dog bites another


@katslepian

katya.slepian@bpdigital.ca

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

49th parallel was an early adopter of Plexiglas shields, and required staff to wear face masks. (49th Parallel photo)
49th Parallel continues to grow in spite of pandemic

The biggest challenge of the pandemic has been keeping shelves stocked at 49th Parallel stores

Freighter anchored off Kin Beach in Chemainus. (Photo by Don Bodger)
MacGregor to host expert panel for virtual town hall on freighter anchorages issue

Residents can participate through MP’s website or Facebook page Dec. 3

Homes ranging from $400,000 to $700,000 are the fastest sellers. (File photo)
High demand and low inventory drive a competitive housing market in Ladysmith

VIREB’s Susan Perrey said buyers are looking to take advantage of low interest rates

École North Oyster. (Black Press file)
With more student drop-offs during pandemic, SD68 examines safety outside North Oyster school

Fewer school bus trips and more cars accentuating traffic concerns, say school district staff

Downtown is believed to be one of the areas best poised for new developments. (File photo)
Development remains consistent in lead up to official community plan process

Pandemic or no pandemic, Ladysmith is growing. New developments have sprung up… Continue reading

Mary Cox and Jack Plant dance in their pyjamas and slippers at the morning pyjama dance during the Rhythm Reelers’ 25 Annual Rally in the Valley Square Dance Festival in Chilliwack on June 4, 2011. Sunday, Nov. 29, 2020 is Square Dancing Day. (Jenna Hauck/ Chilliwack Progress file)
Unofficial holidays: Here’s what people are celebrating for the week of Nov. 29 to Dec. 5

Square Dancing Day, Disability Day and International Ninja Day are all coming up this week

Black Press Media and BraveFace have come together to support children facing life-threatening conditions. Net proceeds from these washable, reusable, three-layer masks go to Make-A-Wish Foundation BC & Yukon.
Put on a BraveFace: Help make children’s wishes come true

Black Press Media, BraveFace host mask fundraiser for Make-A-Wish Foundation

A photo from 2017, of Nuchatlaht First Nation members outside court after filing a land title case in B.C. ( Submitted photo/Nuchatlaht First Nation).
Vancouver Island First Nation calls on B.C. to honour UNDRIP in historic title case

Nuchatlaht First Nation says Crown counsel continues to stall the case using the ‘distasteful’ argument that the Nation ‘abandoned’ their land

West Vancouver Island’s Ehattesaht First Nation continues lock down after 9 active cases were reported today after a visitor tested positive last week. (Ehattesaht First Nation/Facebook)
Ehattesaht First Nation’s COVID-19 nightmare: nine active cases, a storm and a power outage

The Vancouver Island First Nation in a lockdown since the first case was reported last week

114 Canadians were appointed Nov. 27 to the Order of Canada. (Governor General of Canada photo)
Indigenous actor, author, elder, leaders appointed to Order of Canada

Outstanding achievement, community dedication and service recognized

The Ahousaht First Nation confirmed its first case of COVID-19 on Nov. 26, 2020. (Westerly file photo)
Ahousaht First Nation on lockdown over COVID-19

“Emotions are high. The anxiety is high. We want our community to pull through.”

Screenshot of Pastor James Butler giving a sermon at Free Grace Baptist Church in Chilliwack on Nov. 22, 2020. The church has decided to continue in-person services despite a public health order banning worship services that was issued on Nov. 19, 2020. (YouTube)
2 Lower Mainland churches continue in-person services despite public health orders

Pastors say faith groups are unfairly targeted and that charter rights protect their decisions

Most Read