Water restrictions eased

The temperature’s dropping, and the water levels are rising

  • Oct. 9, 2015 5:00 p.m.

The temperature’s dropping, and the water levels are rising, so local governments – including the Town of Ladysmith and the Municipality of North Cowichan – will be easing water restrictions from Stage 3 to Stage 1 as of Oct. 9.

But North Cowichan Mayor Jon Lefebure is urging residents to continue their ‘new normal’ water conservation practices from now on, and not go back to squandering what is being recognized as a precious resource.

“What we are trying to create is a culture of conservation,” he said. “We would ask residents to continue with the practices they have adopted.”

By embracing good practices even between dry spells residents will be helping the municipality manage its water resources better.

“What we at the CVRD (Cowichan Valley Regional District) are calling this is the New Normal,” he said. You can find out more at cvrdnewnormalcowichan.ca. “If we maintain this culture of conservation, we will have adequate water to meet our residential requirements.”

The Stage 1 restrictions will remain in effect until Oct. 31.

“With significant increases in water storage at Cowichan Lake, substantial reductions in water demand from municipal water systems and precipitation forecasted well into the foreseeable future, all local governments in the Cowichan Valley will downgrade the restrictions,” says a joint release from six local governments on the Cowichan Watershed Board.

Stage one restrictions include:

• Residents with even-numbered addresses can water on even-numbered days, between 6 and 8 a.m. or 8 and 10 p.m; residents with odd-numbered addresses can water on odd-numbered days (maximum 2 hours per day);

• Commercial enterprises that use water – power washing or window washing companies, for example – are permitted;

• people can wash cars, boats, driveways and houses;

• Hand watering trees, shrubs, flowers, or vegetables is allowed any day of the week from 6 to 8:00 a.m. or 8 to 10 p.m. using a hose with a spring-loaded nozzle or a bucket (maximum 2 hours per day).

• Micro irrigation or drip irrigation systems may be used anytime for a maximum of 4 hours per day.

 

 

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