Weekend workshop will help you identify edible mushrooms

Learn more about edible mushrooms this weekend at Wildwood Forest in Yellow Point with biologist Jessica Wolf.

Dana Gullison fills her basket with edible oyster mushrooms.

While many people dislike rain, mushroom enthusiasts welcome it.

With the rain comes an abundance of mushrooms, including choice edibles like the chanterelles, lobster, hedgehogs and oysters.

These edible mushrooms are easy to identify, and workshops offered this fall will help novice mushroom pickers to differentiate between the delicious and the deadly.

“Many people are excited by the idea of eating wild mushrooms but afraid of poisoning themselves,” says biologist and workshop leader Jessica Wolf. “While caution is necessary, you can learn to safely forage for many delicious mushrooms.”

Wolf is offering wild edible mushroom workshops Nov. 16, 17 or 18 at Wildwood Forest in Yellow Point.

Workshops participants will have the opportunity to take a close look at samples of edible wild mushrooms and their look-a-likes during a show-and-tell session. Afterwards, they will stroll through the forest in search of specimens growing in their habitat.

For people who are also interested in learning the values of local plants for food and medicine, a second workshop will be offered which combines both plants and mushrooms.

“Foraging for wild food is like a treasure hunt — you never know what you will find when you head into the woods,” says Wolf.

The workshop cost is $45 per person. For more information or to register, visit Jessica Wolf’s website or call 250-327-6931.

To help preserve special wild places, $100 from each Wildwood workshop will be contributed to The Land Conservancy of BC.

— Submitted

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

Vancouver Island’s current COVID-19 case count officially hits zero

Of the 130 recorded Island Health cases, five people have died, 125 recovered

Man found dead in his tent at Chemainus homeless camp

Facebook posts tell of personal struggles and attempts to stay clean and sober

Town of Ladysmith adopts 1.92 percent tax increase for 2020

Mayor Aaron Stone said the increase balances lost revenue while maintaining town services

Ladysmith principal mourns family killed during US protests

Jelks says he’s grateful for the outpouring of support from the community in the wake of this tragedy

Considerations made to keep Crofton drive-by birthday celebrations going

Trucks will tone it down or not use horns at all to bring some joy to kids and older folks

‘I’m pissed, I’m outraged’: Federal minister calls out police violence against Indigenous people

Indigenous Minister Marc Miller spoke on recent incidents, including fatal shooting of a B.C. woman

Facing changes together: Your community, your journalists

We’re asking you to lock arms with us, as we look to better days ahead

Kelowna Mountie who punched suspect identified, condemned by sister

‘How did he get away with this? How is this justifiable?’

PHOTOS: Anti-racism protesters gather in communities across B.C.

More protests are expected through the weekend

Pair accused of ‘horrific’ assault at Vancouver’s Oppenheimer Park at large

Police say Jason Tapp, 30, and Nicole Edwards, 33, did not show up to meet their bail supervisor this week

No charges to be laid against 22 northern B.C. pipeline protesters

Twenty-two people were arrested in February, but Crown has decided not to pursue charges

Plan in place for BC Ferries to start increasing service levels

Ferry corporation reaches temporary service level agreement with province

B.C. starts to see employment return under COVID-19 rules

Jobless rate for young people still over 20% in May

Most Read