alcohol

Bottles of wine at the SAQ in Montreal on Wednesday, July 11, 2018. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Ryan Remiorz

VIDEO: Canadians should get info on how much alcohol is in a standard drink: Bennett

Mental Health and Addictions Minister Carolyn Bennett says Canadians deserve to know…

 

(Black Press Media Creative)

Liquor before beer: Spirits beat brews in new market data

Producers of spirits have new bragging rights in the age-old whiskey vs.…

 

Advocates and business owners in the beverage industry say Canada’s new guidelines for drinking alcohol could speed up changing consumer drinking habits as younger generations are drinking less and non-alcoholic beverages are becoming more popular. An alcoholic beverage is seen in a drinking establishment in Halifax on Wednesday, Aug. 1, 2018. CANADIAN PRESS/Andrew Vaughan

New alcohol recommendations could speed up changing drinking habits: businesses

Trends see customers looking to drink less and explore more non-alcoholic options

 

A person’s purchases are seen in a shopping cart at a government-run BC Liquor Store in Vancouver, on Friday, August 19, 2022. Politicians in charge of provincial liquor corporations aren’t hurrying to adopt or promote updated guidelines that advise a steep drop in Canadian drinking habits. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck

Provincial governments not jumping to act on tighter alcohol warning guidelines

Provinces say they are awaiting Ottawa’s lead on whether to slap warning labels on products

A person’s purchases are seen in a shopping cart at a government-run BC Liquor Store in Vancouver, on Friday, August 19, 2022. Politicians in charge of provincial liquor corporations aren’t hurrying to adopt or promote updated guidelines that advise a steep drop in Canadian drinking habits. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck
An alcoholic beverage is seen in a drinking establishment in Halifax on Wednesday, Aug. 1, 2018. Canada’s new guidance on alcohol is sparking plenty of debate, and while some experts say it could lead to frank conversations with health providers to help drinkers make informed choices, others are questioning the advice to imbibe fewer than two drinks per week. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Andrew Vaughan

Low-risk alcohol guidance sparks debate as drinkers start examining habits, evidence

New guidance is more like a dial rather than a light switch

An alcoholic beverage is seen in a drinking establishment in Halifax on Wednesday, Aug. 1, 2018. Canada’s new guidance on alcohol is sparking plenty of debate, and while some experts say it could lead to frank conversations with health providers to help drinkers make informed choices, others are questioning the advice to imbibe fewer than two drinks per week. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Andrew Vaughan
A report issuing new alcohol consumption guidance for Canadians includes a recommendation for warning labels advising customers about health risks. (Stock photo)

Nanaimo-Ladysmith MP has already crafted motion calling for alcohol warning labels

Canadian Centre on Substance Use and Addiction released new drinking guidelines this week

A report issuing new alcohol consumption guidance for Canadians includes a recommendation for warning labels advising customers about health risks. (Stock photo)
Representatives from Canada’s alcohol industry say mandatory warning labels are not needed on booze containers as suggested in guidance that greatly reduces the amount Canadians should be drinking due to health risks including seven types of cancer. Bottles of British Columbia wine on display at a liquor store in Cremona, Alta., on Feb. 7, 2018. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jeff McIntosh

New alcohol guidance focuses on continuum of risk, suggests warning labels

Report updates Canada’s guidelines set in 2011, when two drinks a day were considered low risk

Representatives from Canada’s alcohol industry say mandatory warning labels are not needed on booze containers as suggested in guidance that greatly reduces the amount Canadians should be drinking due to health risks including seven types of cancer. Bottles of British Columbia wine on display at a liquor store in Cremona, Alta., on Feb. 7, 2018. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jeff McIntosh
New guidance from the Canadian Centre on Substance Use and Addiction suggests Canadians should be seriously cutting back on their drinking if they want to avoid serious health risks. (Pixabay photo)

Worried about Canada’s new alcohol guidance? Try a damp January

New guide suggests 1 to 2 drinks a week is low risk, while more start to increase chance of cancer

  • Jan 17, 2023
New guidance from the Canadian Centre on Substance Use and Addiction suggests Canadians should be seriously cutting back on their drinking if they want to avoid serious health risks. (Pixabay photo)
Lee-Anne Richardson poses in this Jan. 9, 2023 handout photo. Richardson supports a change in Canada’s national low-risk drinking guidelines, to be released next week, and says a dramatic shift in alcohol guidance would be in line with younger people’s attitudes, many of whom are open about the health risks associated with excessive alcohol consumption. THE CANADIAN PRESS/HO - Lee-Anne Richardson

Researchers consider how to ‘denormalize’ drinking culture ahead of new alcohol guide

Canada’s recommendations soon to drop to no more than two drinks a week

Lee-Anne Richardson poses in this Jan. 9, 2023 handout photo. Richardson supports a change in Canada’s national low-risk drinking guidelines, to be released next week, and says a dramatic shift in alcohol guidance would be in line with younger people’s attitudes, many of whom are open about the health risks associated with excessive alcohol consumption. THE CANADIAN PRESS/HO - Lee-Anne Richardson
B.C. Ferries reminds vehicle and foot passengers to avoid alcohol before sailing from its terminals around the province. Nicholas Pescod/Black Press

BC Ferries reminds vehicle, foot passengers to avoid alcohol and drugs before sailings

Impaired drivers and walk-ons risk being reported to police – 127 were in past year

  • Jul 6, 2017
B.C. Ferries reminds vehicle and foot passengers to avoid alcohol before sailing from its terminals around the province. Nicholas Pescod/Black Press