Seniors

This combination of two undated photos released by Guinness World Records on Tuesday, Sept. 21, 2021, show sisters Umeno Sumiyama, left, and Koume Kodama at separate nursing homes in Shodoshima island, left, and Oita prefecture, Japan. The two Japanese twin sisters have been certified by Guinness World Records as the world’s oldest living identical twins, aged 107 years and 300 days as of Sept. 1, 2021, the organization said Monday, Sept. 20, 2021. (Guinness World Records via AP)

Japanese sisters certified as world’s oldest twins at 107

Pair was born on Nov. 5, 1913, and were separated after elementary school

 

Another three residents at Sunset Lodge long-term care home in Esquimalt have died from COVID-19, Island Health announced Sept. 8, bringing the death toll from the Aug. 27 outbreak to four. (Google Maps)

3 more residents die from COVID-19 at Esquimalt long-term care home

15 staff, 21 residents have tested positive since outbreak Aug. 27 at Sunset Lodge

 

Close to 75 protesters with signs marched between FIr Park Village and Echo Village long-term care homes in Port Alberni on Tuesday, Aug. 31, 2021 to advocate for better conditions and management at the facilities. (SUSAN QUINN/ Alberni Valley News)

Supporters protest conditions at two Port Alberni care homes as grievances pile up

Staff shortages are compromising care, says Echo Village resident

 

Hedy Sutulov, seen here on Aug. 12, 2021, turned 107 on Aug. 18, 2021. (Jenna Hauck/ Chilliwack Progress)

‘Feisty’ Chilliwack woman who continued to hike at age 95 celebrates 107th birthday

Hedy Sutulov hiked Mt. Cheam at age 90, lived on her own until 101, had driver’s licence until 104

Hedy Sutulov, seen here on Aug. 12, 2021, turned 107 on Aug. 18, 2021. (Jenna Hauck/ Chilliwack Progress)
The landing page for the Canada Emergency Response Benefit is seen in Toronto, Monday, Aug. 10, 2020. An internal government document is shining a light on how low-income seniors were abruptly cut off from monthly federal payments based on which bureaucratic body handled their emergency benefits last year. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Giordano Ciampini

Lost seniors’ income supplement hinged partly on what agency handled their CERB

Unknown to most, supplement was coming from two streams, one of which can be excluded

The landing page for the Canada Emergency Response Benefit is seen in Toronto, Monday, Aug. 10, 2020. An internal government document is shining a light on how low-income seniors were abruptly cut off from monthly federal payments based on which bureaucratic body handled their emergency benefits last year. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Giordano Ciampini
Chris Sherlock, a 65-year-old resident of British Columbia’s Cowichan Valley, is seen in an undated handout photo. Sherlock, who relied on the CERB last year, says he was never told his monthly income would drop by nearly $500 as a consequence. New Democrats say they’ve have been flooded with calls from seniors who suddenly find themselves cut off from monthly government payments due to emergency benefits they received last year. THE CANADIAN PRESS/HO-Chris Sherlock, *MANDATORY CREDIT*

Seniors cut off from federal income supplement after receiving emergency benefits

$2,000 a month in Canada Emergency Response Benefit has rendered some ineligible

Chris Sherlock, a 65-year-old resident of British Columbia’s Cowichan Valley, is seen in an undated handout photo. Sherlock, who relied on the CERB last year, says he was never told his monthly income would drop by nearly $500 as a consequence. New Democrats say they’ve have been flooded with calls from seniors who suddenly find themselves cut off from monthly government payments due to emergency benefits they received last year. THE CANADIAN PRESS/HO-Chris Sherlock, *MANDATORY CREDIT*
A health care worker leaves after finishing her shift for the day at the Eatonville Care Centre in Toronto on Friday, April 24, 2020. A report published this morning by parliamentary budget officer Yves Giroux estimates ending wait lists, increasing staff pay and benefits, providing more hours of care each day and expanding home care could cost around $13.7 billion. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Nathan Denette

Fixing long-term care in Canada could cost $13.7B, budget watchdog estimates

Pandemic infected more than 1/4 of Canada’s 205,000 long-term care residents, killing over 15,000

A health care worker leaves after finishing her shift for the day at the Eatonville Care Centre in Toronto on Friday, April 24, 2020. A report published this morning by parliamentary budget officer Yves Giroux estimates ending wait lists, increasing staff pay and benefits, providing more hours of care each day and expanding home care could cost around $13.7 billion. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Nathan Denette
Diane Cleary and Jack Ball were among the seniors dancing in a parking lot July 31 in Nanaimo’s Old City Quarter. (Greg Sakaki/News Bulletin)

Seniors dance in parking lot while Nanaimo’s indoor dances are cancelled

Organizer said seniors were ‘bored’ without Thursday night dances at activity centre

Diane Cleary and Jack Ball were among the seniors dancing in a parking lot July 31 in Nanaimo’s Old City Quarter. (Greg Sakaki/News Bulletin)
Christine Connon and Dave Wright will be the first couple to wed at White Rock Seniors Village, in a ceremony July 31. (Contributed photo)

B.C. seniors find love amid pandemic – ‘and I didn’t even know her name’

Christine Connon and Dave Wright’s wedding will be the first at White Rock Seniors Village

Christine Connon and Dave Wright will be the first couple to wed at White Rock Seniors Village, in a ceremony July 31. (Contributed photo)
Minister of Seniors Deb Schulte speaks during a press conference on Parliament Hill during the COVID-19 pandemic in Ottawa on Thursday, June 4, 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick

One-time payments to seniors over 75 likely to also go to the dead

Government wouldn’t seek to recoup the deposits made to the deceased, documents say

Minister of Seniors Deb Schulte speaks during a press conference on Parliament Hill during the COVID-19 pandemic in Ottawa on Thursday, June 4, 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick
Doris Gage (left) poses with her grandson Nash and her granddaughter Meghan Mitchell on April 1, 2021, when restrictions were lifted to allow in-suite visits. (Contributed photo)

COVID-19 restrictions lifting at B.C. seniors home ‘absolutely’ a big deal

Doris Gage, 95, is set to celebrate her great-grandson’s 1st birthday July 24

Doris Gage (left) poses with her grandson Nash and her granddaughter Meghan Mitchell on April 1, 2021, when restrictions were lifted to allow in-suite visits. (Contributed photo)
Staying at home is preferred by most seniors to moving to assisted living or other care facilities, but B.C. has a shortage of home care staff and some seniors move into care before it is medically necessary. (Office of the Seniors Advocate)

B.C., care homes partner to train more senior home support staff

Entry-level candidates to receive paid work placements

Staying at home is preferred by most seniors to moving to assisted living or other care facilities, but B.C. has a shortage of home care staff and some seniors move into care before it is medically necessary. (Office of the Seniors Advocate)
John Hillman, 102, marks down the last lap for the day hitting 80 on July 6. (Christine van Reeuwyk/News Staff)
John Hillman, 102, marks down the last lap for the day hitting 80 on July 6. (Christine van Reeuwyk/News Staff)
Grand Forks Fire/Rescue volunteers attended Sunday’s incident at the Hardy View Lodge. Photo: Laurie Tritschler

Sunday’s heat trips sprinkler system at West Kootenay seniors’ home

Interior Health was still assessing the damage at Grand Forks’ Hardy View Lodge as of Sunday evening

Grand Forks Fire/Rescue volunteers attended Sunday’s incident at the Hardy View Lodge. Photo: Laurie Tritschler
Parliamentary Budget Officer Yves Giroux waits to appear before the Commons Finance committee on Parliament Hill in Ottawa, Tuesday March 10, 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian Wyld

Boost to seniors benefit this summer and beyond could cost $10.7 billion

Parliamentary budget officer is estimating the Liberals’ plan might be cheaper than anticipated

Parliamentary Budget Officer Yves Giroux waits to appear before the Commons Finance committee on Parliament Hill in Ottawa, Tuesday March 10, 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian Wyld
John Kromhoff with some of the many birthday cards he received from ‘pretty near every place in the world’ after the family of the Langley centenarian let it be known that he wasn’t expecting many cards for his 100th birthday. (Special to Langley Advance Times)

Cards from all over the world flood in for B.C. man’s 100th birthday

An online invitation by his family produced a flood of cards to mark his 100th birthday

John Kromhoff with some of the many birthday cards he received from ‘pretty near every place in the world’ after the family of the Langley centenarian let it be known that he wasn’t expecting many cards for his 100th birthday. (Special to Langley Advance Times)
Minister of Seniors Deb Schulte responds to a question during question period in the House of Commons on Parliament Hill in Ottawa on Friday, Dec. 11, 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/ Patrick Doyle

Liberal government moves to define ‘elder abuse’ to better target ways to stop it

Increasing cases of abuse, neglect, financial abuse or abuse of power-of-attorney being flagged

Minister of Seniors Deb Schulte responds to a question during question period in the House of Commons on Parliament Hill in Ottawa on Friday, Dec. 11, 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/ Patrick Doyle
(File photo)

B.C. senior calls driving exams for seniors aged 80 and up ‘unfair’

Protest being planned for when COVID-19 pandemic restrictions lifted

(File photo)
Dr. Howard Njoo, Deputy Chief Public Health Officer at Public Health Agency of Canada. THE CANADIAN PRESS/David Kawai

Canadian seniors vaccinated in higher numbers for COVID-19 than for the flu: PHAC

Public Health Officer Dr. Howard Njoo says almost 9 in 10 Canadian seniors were vaccinated from COVID-19, compared to 7 in 10 for the flu shot

Dr. Howard Njoo, Deputy Chief Public Health Officer at Public Health Agency of Canada. THE CANADIAN PRESS/David Kawai
Nancy Bright presents an envelope to Grayson Magee containing $50 in appreciation for helping her after a fall in Askew Creek in Chemainus. (Photo by Don Bodger)

Vancouver Island senior rewards student saviour

Cash reward provided for assistance beyond the call of duty in a Chemainus park

Nancy Bright presents an envelope to Grayson Magee containing $50 in appreciation for helping her after a fall in Askew Creek in Chemainus. (Photo by Don Bodger)