Tourism

Hesquiaht Harbour. (Hesquiaht First Nation)

Visitors and non-residents entering closed remote B.C. First Nation’s territories

With limited resources, they say they don’t have any authority or power to enforce the closures

  • Aug 6, 2020
Hesquiaht Harbour. (Hesquiaht First Nation)
Could you imagine a couple of these guys hanging around Crofton for a while? (Photo submitted)

Dino-mite chance to snag some dinosaurs

Crofton man in the hunt for a piece of a rare collection at auction

Could you imagine a couple of these guys hanging around Crofton for a while? (Photo submitted)
Visitors Center along Hwy 5 to the town of Valemount, B.C., with the Cariboo Mountain range in background. (Village of Valemount/Wikimedia Commons)

Northern communities welcome tourists as province opens to in-B.C. travellers

Officials have asked British Columbians to be careful as they travel this summer

  • Jul 6, 2020
Visitors Center along Hwy 5 to the town of Valemount, B.C., with the Cariboo Mountain range in background. (Village of Valemount/Wikimedia Commons)
B.C. accommodators need phone lines to light up as in-province travel given green light

B.C. accommodators need phone lines to light up as in-province travel given green light

Travel restrictions during the COVID-19 pandemic have decimated the tourism and hospitality industries

  • Jul 5, 2020
B.C. accommodators need phone lines to light up as in-province travel given green light
A Homalco member poses in their traditional attire. (Photo courtesy Homalco Tours)

Indigenous B.C. tour operator keeps culture alive through virtual journeys in COVID-19 era

Campbell River based Homalco Tours is also setting up live cameras for bear viewing in Orford

A Homalco member poses in their traditional attire. (Photo courtesy Homalco Tours)
B.C. Premier John Horgan speaks about economic recovery from the COVID-19 pandemic at the B.C. legislature, June 17, 2020. (B.C. government)

B.C. Liberals criticize Horgan’s economic recovery plan for excluding tourism sector representation

The Economic Recovery Task Force began meeting weekly on conference calls in April

B.C. Premier John Horgan speaks about economic recovery from the COVID-19 pandemic at the B.C. legislature, June 17, 2020. (B.C. government)
An aerial view of Gold River. (Photo/Village of Gold River)

Gold River ready to welcome visitors and restart local businesses

In contrast to single-industry remote communities, Gold River’s diversified economy might help it better survive after reopening

An aerial view of Gold River. (Photo/Village of Gold River)
Feds earmark $1.5M to support recovery of B.C., Indigenous tourism

Feds earmark $1.5M to support recovery of B.C., Indigenous tourism

B.C. money will be split between Vancouver Island and Indigenous tourism

Feds earmark $1.5M to support recovery of B.C., Indigenous tourism
The AIDAdiva cruise ship, on a 10-day trip from New York to Montreal, arrives in Halifax on Friday, Oct. 19, 2018. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Andrew Vaughan

Large cruise ships barred from Canadian waters until end of October: Garneau

Last year 140 cruise ships brought more than two million visitors to Canadian ports

The AIDAdiva cruise ship, on a 10-day trip from New York to Montreal, arrives in Halifax on Friday, Oct. 19, 2018. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Andrew Vaughan
Cedars Inn, Zeballos. (Contributed photo)

Historic hotel and only restaurant in remote Zeballos considers shutting its doors

Cedars Inn unsure about future after series of financial catastrophes, COVID-19 induced tourism dip

Cedars Inn, Zeballos. (Contributed photo)
Tofino Bus Service claims north island bus service is unsustainable without subsidy. (viconnector.com Photo)

Tofino Bus Service wants to cancel service to the north island

“There is no model without subsidy that makes [this service] sustainable.”

Tofino Bus Service claims north island bus service is unsustainable without subsidy. (viconnector.com Photo)
(The Canadian Press)

Beach bummer: Novel coronavirus can live in water, but is it infectious?

Living in water and being infectious in water are different things

(The Canadian Press)
Jock Finlayson is executive vice president and chief policy officer of the Business Council of BC. (Submitted)

COLUMN: Residents should explore B.C. to help tourism industry amid COVID-19

Jock Finlayson is executive vice president and chief policy officer of the Business Council of BC

  • May 11, 2020
Jock Finlayson is executive vice president and chief policy officer of the Business Council of BC. (Submitted)
While tourism hangs by a thread during the COVID-19 crisis, there’s always hope people will return to the wilderness to connect and heal after the crisis resolves. (Strathcona Park Lodge and Outdoor Education Centre/Facebook)

Vancouver Island wilderness tourism operator optimistic despite business dip

Christine Clarke, a Strathcona tourism operator, believes that people will want to ‘connect’ and come back to nature to ‘heal’ post COVID-19

While tourism hangs by a thread during the COVID-19 crisis, there’s always hope people will return to the wilderness to connect and heal after the crisis resolves. (Strathcona Park Lodge and Outdoor Education Centre/Facebook)
Your day trip to Victoria awaits

Your day trip to Victoria awaits

Must-see local attractions from whale-watching to a back-alley shops

Your day trip to Victoria awaits
Discover Duncan

Discover Duncan

An inviting region of quaint communities, outdoor recreation and agricultural attractions

  • Apr 23, 2020
Discover Duncan
Discover Ladysmith

Discover Ladysmith

History, arts and world-class outdoor recreational opportunities

  • Apr 22, 2020
Discover Ladysmith
A Jimi Hendrix-inspired sand sculpture by Peter Vogelaar pictured at the Quality Foods Sand Sculpting Competition and Exhibition. The competition will now return in 2021, after the 2020 Parksville Beach Festival has been cancelled due to the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic. (File photo)

Castles in the sand: Parksville Beach Festival latest big Island event sunk by the pandemic

International sand sculpting competition among events sidelined

A Jimi Hendrix-inspired sand sculpture by Peter Vogelaar pictured at the Quality Foods Sand Sculpting Competition and Exhibition. The competition will now return in 2021, after the 2020 Parksville Beach Festival has been cancelled due to the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic. (File photo)
A popular tourist spot on the island, Zeballos offers travellers a range of wilderness recreational activities. (photo credit/Lyn Hawley)

Zeballos doesn’t expect to feel the pinch of COVID-19 restrictions until tourist season

With a small population, seasonal businesses and a single medical clinic, the coastal village braces for an impact, if any

A popular tourist spot on the island, Zeballos offers travellers a range of wilderness recreational activities. (photo credit/Lyn Hawley)
The Gwaii Haanas legacy totem pole is seen after being raised in Windy Bay, B.C., on Lyell Island in Haida Gwaii on August 15, 2013. As the COVID-19 pandemic forces remote British Columbia communities to close their borders to outsiders, Indigenous tourism companies along the coast say the federal government is leaving them behind. Tours for Haida Gwaii are normally booked well in advance due to high demand and the quota system placed on the area. The remoteness of the region also means it has a shorter tourism high season than other locations in the province. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck

Indigenous tourism being ignored by federal government, B.C. operators say

Tourism associations say little to nothing has been done to help their sector during the COVID-19 pandemic

The Gwaii Haanas legacy totem pole is seen after being raised in Windy Bay, B.C., on Lyell Island in Haida Gwaii on August 15, 2013. As the COVID-19 pandemic forces remote British Columbia communities to close their borders to outsiders, Indigenous tourism companies along the coast say the federal government is leaving them behind. Tours for Haida Gwaii are normally booked well in advance due to high demand and the quota system placed on the area. The remoteness of the region also means it has a shorter tourism high season than other locations in the province. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck