John Nuttall, left, and Amanda Korody, leave jail after a judge ruled the couple were entrapped by the RCMP in a police-manufactured crime, in Vancouver, B.C., on Friday July 29, 2016. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck

B.C. Court of Appeal to rule in terror case that centres on RCMP conduct

B.C.’s appeal court is scheduled to release a decision today on a couple whose guilty verdict over plotting to blow up the provincial legislature was thrown out by a lower court judge.

British Columbia’s Appeal Court is scheduled to release a decision today on a couple whose guilty verdict over plotting to blow up the provincial legislature was thrown out by a lower court judge.

The Crown argued at an appeal hearing in January that B.C. Supreme Court Justice Catherine Bruce had no basis to conclude the RCMP manipulated John Nuttall and Amanda Korody into planting explosive devices around the legislature.

In June 2015, a jury found Nuttall and Korody guilty of conspiring to commit murder, possessing an explosive substance and placing an explosive in a public place on behalf of a terrorist group.

The convictions were put on hold until 2016 when Bruce ruled they had been entrapped by police, who she said used trickery, deceit and veiled threats to engineer the bomb plot.

Read more: Couple caught up in B.C. Legislature bomb plot to learn their fate

Read more: B.C. judge questions Crown’s urgency in applying for peace bond in terror case

Lawyers for Nuttall and Korody said there was no reason to reverse the stays of proceedings, arguing the couple feared they would be killed by the shadowy terrorist group if they didn’t follow through with the bomb plot.

Nuttall and Korody were arrested on Canada Day 2013 and charged with multiple terrorism-related offences after planting what they thought were pressure-cooker bombs at legislature.

Defence lawyers have argued the RCMP acted on unreasonable suspicions to exploit two vulnerable people, steering them towards a manufactured crime that was planned, prepared and all but carried out by police.

The Canadian Press

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Just Posted

Diamond District woman warns against the use of rat poison

At some point between breakfast and lunch Martin had suddenly collapsed and died

Calling all believers: Chemainus Theatre Festival runs Miracle on 34th Street

Opening night is Friday, November 15, and closing is December 29

Remembering Jack Neil, ace fighter pilot and father

Remembrance Day is an opportunity for John Neil to remember his father, Jack

Ladysmith Arts Council creates Remembrance Day poppies for display

The poppies were prepared by both established artists, and student artists

Carbon monoxide poisoning incident brings dangers of the gas to light

Chemainus adult and child go to hospital for treatment

VIDEO: Disney Plus gives Canadians a streaming platform that nearly matches U.S. version

The Walt Disney Company’s new subscription platform unveiled a comprehensive offering of nearly 500 films

B.C.’s 13-cent gasoline gap still a mystery, Premier John Horgan says

NDP plans legislation this month, seeks action from Justin Trudeau

Former Vancouver Canucks player suing financial advisors for negligence

Jason Garrison claimed his advisors failed to take his circumstances into account

Group walking on thin ice at B.C. lake sparks warning from RCMP

At least seven people were spotted on Joffre Lakes, although the ice is not thick enough to be walked on

B.C. teacher said he would use student to ‘whack’ two others on Grade 8 field trip

Campbell River teacher-on-call suspended three weeks after November 2018 incident

Petition to ‘bring back Don Cherry’ goes viral after immigrant poppy rant

Cherry was fired from his co-hosting role for the Coach’s Corner segment on Nov. 11.

Bill Murray dons iconic Hudson’s Bay scarf to watch Canucks game in Vancouver

Murray is in Vancouver to film The Now, a mini-series directed by Peter Farrelly

Canadian allergists’ group wants Benadryl behind the counter due to side effects

Some doctors say the medication is over-used because of its easy availability

B.C. government grappling with multiple labour disputes by public-sector unions

Public-sector unions may have expectations of a labour-friendly NDP government

Most Read