The B.C. Ferries vessel Coastal Inspiration, seen Sunday, Dec. 15, in Nanaimo’s Departure Bay. (GREG SAKAKI/The News Bulletin)

The B.C. Ferries vessel Coastal Inspiration, seen Sunday, Dec. 15, in Nanaimo’s Departure Bay. (GREG SAKAKI/The News Bulletin)

B.C. Ferries getting rid of fuel surcharge

Ferry corporation uses system of surcharges and rebates to manage ‘volatility’ in fuel prices

B.C. Ferries is eliminating its fuel surcharge just in time for holiday travel.

The ferry corporation announced in a press release Monday that it will remove its 1.5-per cent fuel surcharge as of Tuesday, Dec. 17.

“The recent decrease in the price of fuel allows us to eliminate the fuel surcharges, which is great news for travellers,” said Alana Gallagher, B.C. Ferries’ vice-president and CFO, in the release. “We understand that affordability is important to our customers and every bit helps.”

B.C. Ferries notes in the release that it “closely monitors the price of fuel” and applies a rebate, surcharge or neither when collecting ferry fares. Ferries says it has been using the system for 15 years to “manage the volatility in the price of fuel” and says it doesn’t benefit financially from surcharges.

The 1.5-per cent fuel surcharge had been in place since June 1 and amounted to 25 cents per person and 85 cents per vehicle on major routes and 15 cents per person and 45 cents per vehicle on smaller routes.

READ ALSO: Hybrid vessels part of B.C. Ferries’ plans to reduce emissions

READ ALSO: B.C. Ferries’ president on LNG and northern routes



editor@nanaimobulletin.com

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