A forklift carefully lowered a field pumpkin on to the weigh scales at Krause Berry Farms on Saturday (Oct. 5) during the annual weigh-in. (Dan Ferguson/Langley Advance Times)

Man breaks two B.C. records at annual pumpkin weigh-off

The secret is good soil and proper nutrients, winner says

Scott Carley said producing plus-size pumpkins requires quality soil, “good drainage and a good nutrient plan.”

It would appear the South Langley resident knows what he’s talking about.

On Saturday, Carley won three awards at the annual pumpkin weigh-off competition hosted by Krause Berry Farms, breaking two B.C. records in the process.

His field pumpkin, a 111 pounds, was nearly double the previous record of 64 pounds.

He broke his own record for a giant squash, with a weight of 1,066 pounds, a jump from the previous record of 722 pounds.

Carley also took first place in pumpkins, with what was, to Carley, a relatively small 1,213 pounds, short of the B.C. record of 1,543 lbs. he set in 2017.

“This wasn’t a great growing year,” he observed.

All his entries are grown on Carley’s small acreage in south Langley.

READ MORE: VIDEO: Langley man sets B.C. record for heaviest pumpkin

READ MORE: Giant squash grows in Brookswood

Jeff Pelletier of North Vancouver won largest bushel gourd with a 219-pounder and largest tomato (2.04 lbs.).

Pelletier said he was inspired by the “Great Pumpkin” in the “peanuts strip.

“I blame Charles Schulz (Peanuts creator),” he laughed.

Officiated by the Great Pumpkin Commonwealth, the event is certified as a world recognized giant pumpkin weigh-off event.

Sponsors provided cash and prizes for first to 10th place, plus raffle draw prizes for guests.

Krause Berry Farms owner Alf Krause, who drove the forklift that lifted the gigantic entries on the weigh scales, said at least a “couple thousand” turned to watch.

“It was definitely the largest to date,” Krause said.

Winning entries will remain on display at 6179 248th Street till the end of October.

More photos of the day can be viewed online.



dan.ferguson@langleyadvancetimes.com

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Getting a close look at one of the entries at the annual pumpkin weigh-in competition at Krause Berry Farms on Saturday, Oct. 5. (Dan Ferguson/Langley Advance Times)

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