Province orders review of BC Transit

The B.C. government is preparing an outside review the operation of BC Transit, after local elections.

Transportation Minister Blair Lekstrom

VICTORIA – The B.C. government is preparing an outside review the operation of BC Transit, once the dust settles from this month’s municipal elections.

Transportation Minister Blair Lekstrom announced the review at the B.C. legislature Wednesday, after hearing complaints from municipalities about the way the provincial agency decides to buy property or equipment that has an unexpected impact on local government budgets.

“There were concerns raised about dialogue,” Lekstrom said. “I think we can do a better job with BC Transit, whether it’s on the capital planning side and how our service is delivered.”

Lekstrom vowed to work with municipal leaders on the terms of the review, once local elections are completed Nov. 19 and new councils begin their three-year terms.

BC Transit operates bus services in communities outside Metro Vancouver, with financing from a province-wide gasoline tax. It receives funding from 58 local governments, and had a budget of $249 million last year.

Current legislation has the province paying 47 per cent of costs for regional transit systems, with the rest raised by local governments. The local share is about half from fare and advertising revenue, and the rest from property tax. The province funds two thirds of handyDART transit services for the disabled.

Greater Victoria municipalities have proposed a regional transit agency similar to Translink, which collects its own fuel taxes and manages the system through a mayors’ council. Translink is currently considering an additional two cents a litre gasoline tax to fund extension of the SkyTrain system from Burnaby to Coquitlam.

Lekstrom said the review won’t deal directly with issues such as different fuel tax rates in different regions. It will consider proposals for greater regional authority over the expansion and operation of transit services.

Just Posted

Home care complaints up 45% on Vancouver Island

Number of home care hours delivered down 6%, complaints up 45 %

Plantitude giving Ladysmith vegans equal footing

New downtown restaurant believed to be downtown’s first featuring all vegan options

Volunteers take down after another successful Ladysmith Festival of Lights

Good crowd comes out for a sunny Sunday volunteer session of taking down decorations

Blood moon over Ladysmith

Gerry Beltgens shook off cold fingers this weekend to capture this image… Continue reading

Reflections of Ladysmith: The Art of Michael Dean

Work, place and people are inseparable for Vancouver Island painter

New Canada Food Guide nixes portion sizes, promotes plant-based proteins

Guide no longer lists milk and dairy products as a distinct food group

B.C. legislature managers accused of excessive travel, personal expense claims

Clerk Craig James, security chief Gary Lenz call allegations ‘completely false’

One-third of pregnant women think cannabis won’t harm their baby: UBC

Review of six U.S. studies found doctors didn’t communicate health risks of pot use

China demands US drop Huawei extradition request with Canada

China detained two Canadians on Dec. 10 in an apparent attempt to pressure Canada to release Meng

Hollywood announces 2019 Oscar nominations

Netflix has scored its first best picture nomination, something the streaming giant has dearly sought

Collapsed floor traps worker at decommissioned North Island pulp mill

Man frees self, escapes injury, investigation underway at Elk Falls facility in Campbell River

Auto shop apologizes after Vancouver Island employees disrespect memorial convoy

Mr. Lube staff members suspended after incident Sunday in Nanaimo

B.C. man fined $10,000 after leaving moose to suffer before death

Surrey man was convicted last week on three Wildlife Act charges

‘Blue Monday’ isn’t real, but depression can be

CMHA encourages people to prioritize their mental health

Most Read