Students with tech skills are in high demand

The opportunities for those seeking work in the technology field are considerable.

“British Columbia has a ready source of great jobs and careers in technology. Our education programs need to keep up with that demand.”

John Leech, executive director of the Applied Science Technologists and Technicians of BC (ASTTBC), explains that, “Every system we rely on — water, roads and transportation, telecommunications and Internet, hydro and natural gas, environment, health, forestry, and many more — utilizes engineering and applied science technology professionals working in the background. B.C.’s telecom and IT, animation and many other sectors produce new careers every month.”

ASTTBC has more than 10,000 members currently working in thousands of careers available to graduates of two-year diploma programs available at the British Columbia Institute of Technology and other B.C. colleges and institutes.

“Our members enjoy rewarding, well-paid and often recession-proof careers in public service and the private sector alike,” Leech states. “For huge numbers of young men and women, technology is the answer. In B.C.  and across Canada, technology permeates every workplace and job. We need to get capable students involved and engaged in applied sciences and head off workforce shortages by building a B.C. ‘Science and Technology Culture.’”

Leech calls on government for renewed efforts to build student skills and confidence in math and science programming.

“We especially need to interest young students in science and how things work,” he said. “Young students use technology every day — smart phones, iPads and computers. They play video games, even build robots.”

Leech lauds the recent “Year of Science” program that encouraged students toward so-called “STEM” subjects — science, technology, engineering and math. Citing the recent $6-million B.C. campaign to encourage careers in trades, Leech urges a similar effort to build awareness of engineering technology education and careers.

BC Technology Industries Association employers like Telus and BC Hydro and many smaller technology-rich companies say the single most important position they now struggle to fill is Specialty Technician/Technologist. Even the Canadian Council of Chief Executives expressed concern that only 37 per cent of 16- to 18-year-olds were interested in taking even one post-secondary course in sciences, according to a recent Angus Reid survey.

Leech says the opportunities for those seeking work in the technology field are considerable given a wave of retirements of present-generation technology professionals that is already underway.

Students in Ladysmith and Nanaimo have the opportunity to gain the skills needed for these positions while they are still in Grade 11 and 12 through School District 68’s Career Technical Centre (CTC). CTC students simultaneously work towards completing their high school diploma and post-secondary certification by receiving dual credits for their post-secondary coursework.

One of the programs in which students can receive entry-level certification is Information and Technology and Applied Systems (ITAS).

The  program prepares students for careers in the design, installation, operation, and administration of network and Internet-based information systems. The program combines rigorous theoretical and technical education with hands-on, project-based learning.

— Black Press

Just Posted

(File photo)
Poverty reduction survey identifies 10 poverty themes

Poverty reduction plan will be finalized in July 2021

Nanaimo-Ladysmith MP Paul Manly says he has no intentions of leaving the Green Party. (House of Commons image)
Island Green MPs have “no intention” of leaving the party after ‘heartbreaking’ departure

Manly, May only remaining Green MPs after Jenica Atwin left for the Liberals over internal disputes

New COVID-19 cases on Vancouver Island by local health area for the week of May 30-June 5. (B.C. Centre for Disease Control image)
COVID-19 cases drop again almost everywhere on Vancouver Island

Nanaimo had four new cases last week, down from 22 the week before

Justine Keefer’s Cedar Elementary School Grade 6/7 class put together a student paper, as part of a school project. Pictured here Andrew Gregory, left, Felix Leduc, Addison Armstrong, Lucia Walker and Anise Dick. (Karl Yu/News Bulletin)
Cedar Elementary School students create their own newspaper

Grade 6/7 class publishes Wolf Pack News as part of language arts and social studies

Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau participates in a plenary session at the G7 Summit in Carbis Bay, England on Friday June 11, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian Wyld
Canada donating 13M surplus COVID-19 vaccine doses to poor countries

Trudeau says the government will pay for 87 million shots to be distributed to poor countries

Darren Campbell’s truck (pictured) was stolen when he stopped to check on a car in a ditch on Cowichan Bay Road on Monday morning. (Facebook photo)
Vancouver Island Good Samaritan’s truck stolen in nasty trick

‘Try to be a Good Samaritan and my $20,000 truck gets stolen right under my nose’

The Kamloops Indian Residential School is photographed using a drone in Kamloops, B.C., Monday, June, 14, 2021. The remains of 215 children were discovered buried near the former school earlier this month. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward
Communities grapple with what to do with former residential and day schools

Some tear them down as a tool to help healing, others repurpose them as tools for moving forward

Creative handmade signs abound at the June 13 Tofino rally for old growth trees. (Nora O’Malley photo)
VIDEO: Tofino stands in solidarity for Fairy Creek Blockades

Over 150 supporters attend rally hosted by Friends of Clayoquot Sound

FILE – Provincial health officer Dr. Bonnie Henry talks about B.C.’s plan to restart the province during a press conference at Legislature in Victoria, Tuesday, May 25, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Chad Hipolito
B.C. officials watching U.K.’s Delta variant struggles, ‘may need to slow’ restart plan

Studies show that one dose of vaccine is only 33 per cent effective in preventing B.1.617.2 spread

RCMP Const. Shelby Patton is shown in this undated handout photo. RCMP say that Patton was hit by an allegedly stolen truck that he had pulled over on Saturday morning in Wolseley, east of Regina. THE CANADIAN PRESS/HO, RCMP
Pair charged in Saskatchewan Mountie’s death make first court appearance

Const. Shelby Patton was hit by an allegedly stolen truck that he had pulled over Saturday morning

David and Collet Stephan leave for a break during an appeal hearing in Calgary on Thursday, March 9, 2017. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Todd Korol
Appeal Court rejects stay for Alberta couple facing third trial in son’s death

Pair accused in their earlier trials of not seeking medical attention for their son sooner

Highway notices like this come down effective June 14. Public health restrictions on non-essential travel and commercial operation have hit local businesses in every corner of B.C. (B.C. government)
Province-wide travel back on in B.C.’s COVID-19 restart plan

Gathering changes include up to 50 people for outdoor events

Calgary Stampeders’ Jerome Messam leaps over a tackle during second half CFL western semifinal football action in Calgary, Sunday, Nov. 15, 2015.THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jeff McIntosh
CFL football will be played this summer in Canada

Governors vote unanimously in favour to start the ‘21 campaign on Aug. 5

Most Read