The Catatonic partially sank in a 2017 accident that killed two fishers. While fatalities can be observed through long-term trends, the Transportation Safety Board will be updating its internal data system to make it easier to observe trends. (Transportation Safety Board of Canada photo)

The Catatonic partially sank in a 2017 accident that killed two fishers. While fatalities can be observed through long-term trends, the Transportation Safety Board will be updating its internal data system to make it easier to observe trends. (Transportation Safety Board of Canada photo)

Transportation Safety Board to update database system

The current system doesn’t make online accident reports easy

The Transportation Safety Board of Canada releases marine reports daily, monthly and annually, but theirdatabase system could use some tweaking.

“What we use to track safety accidents is not the best,” said Glenn Budden, regional senior investigator forfishing vessels and marine- pacific. It’s Budden’s job to analyze the reports that end up on his desk, and followup with high-risk or repeated incidents.

“Unless you’re tracking exposure to these risks, it’s hard to get a rate,” he said. “That’s the only way to compareinformation is with other provinces and other years.”

READ MORE: Fatal Tofino boat accident under investigation

ALSO READ: Coroner urges mandatory life-jackets in report on Tofino whale-watching tragedy

The TSB uses a database system called MARSIS, which was updated five years ago. This system collectsreportable incidents and accidents. Under TSB regulations, there are mandatory reporting requirements forcertain incidences, which are not confidential or anonymous.

There are is also a separate system called SECURITAS where people can report potentially unsafe acts orconditions. While this system is marked as confidential, the only electronic way to submit a complaint is bydirect email, or alternatively through a phone line or mailing system.

ALSO READ: Transportation Safety Board worried about employee fatigue

However, the TSB is hoping to adjust their database by allowing for electronic submissions.

“The Transportation Safety Board is revamping it’s data system,” Budden said. “There will be an internal datatransfer from the reporting forum directly to the marine occurrence database.”

This means once information has been filled out and reviewed, it will be added to a larger online database thatcan better offer insights into marine occurrence trends.

These online submissions can then be compared with data from the Department of Fisheries and Oceans, andTransport Canada.

ALSO READ: Poorly-managed fatigue led to fuel spill off northern B.C. coast

While most reports currently come from incidences which involve the Canadian Coast Guard, Search and Rescue,or the local traffic channel, Budden feels hopeful that an easier reporting system will encourage more voluntarysubmissions for non-mandatory incidents or accidents.

“Maybe you were up for four days and fell asleep and grounded,” he said. “If that happened to someone they’dfeel embarrassed, and might also fear repercussions from their employer.”

Talk of the database update are just in the beginning stages, but anything that could add more informationwould be a great tool

“Tracking accidents and trends allows us to provide information on safety and lessons learned,” Budden said,referring to current and future conditions. “The better reporting we have in place, the better information we’regoing to get.”

**Editor’s note: this story has been updated from its original version. The original version stated there would be a new database system, not an update to the current system.

nicole.crescenzi@vicnews.com


Send a Tweet: @NicoleCrescenzi

Like us on Facebook  

Transportation Safety Board

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

Chakalaka Bar & Grill remains open in defiance of orders from Island Health to close. (Cole Schisler photo)
Island Health seeks injunction against restaurant defying COVID-19 orders

VIHA says Chakalaka Bar and Grill also violating water and sewer regulations with RV hook-ups

CVRD offices on Ingram Street will remain closed for another 14 weeks after flooding last month. (File photo)
CVRD headquarters closed for another three and a half months

Building significantly damaged during water leak

The IIO is investigating after a police dog bit a man during a traffic stop near Ladysmith on April 17, 2021. (Black Press Media stock photo)
IIO investigating after police dog bites man near Ladysmith

RCMP dog bit man during traffic stop on Friday, April 17

Ladysmith Save-On-Foods. (Cole Schisler photo)
$5.4 million in renovations coming for Ladysmith Save-On-Foods

Save-On-Foods would not say when the renovations will begin

Stz’uminus Elder George Harris, Ladysmith Mayor Aaron Stone, and Stz’uminus Chief Roxanne Harris opened the ceremony. (Cole Schisler photo)
Red dresses to be hung from Ladysmith to Oyster Bay, showing solidarity against racism

Leaders from Stz’uminus First Nation and the Town of Ladysmith hung new dresses on Sat. April 17

Public health restrictions on non-essential travel and vacation bookings are being increased in B.C. (B.C. government)
Out-of-region B.C. vacation bookings, RV ferry reservations to be refused, Horgan says

B.C. extends COVID-19 indoor dining, group fitness ban until May 25

(New Westminster Police)
4 youth arrested after 30-person brawl in New Westminster leaves 1 seriously injured

Police are looking for witnesses who saw the incident take place

South Surrey’s Paul Cottrell, who works with the DFO, tows a grey whale out of Semiahmoo Bay Sunday. (Contributed photo)
Dead whale floating near White Rock towed to shore for necropsy

Animal has been dead since at least April 15

Wickaninnish (Clifford Atleo) plays the drum while singing the Nuu-chah-nulth song on the court steps in Vancouver In a picture from April 2018. Photo credit, Melody Charlie.
Five western Vancouver Island First Nations celebrate legal fishing victory

Court ruling confirms Nuu-chah-nulth fishing rights in case dating back to 2003

Sunday’s storm rocked one of the ferries crossing Kootenay Lake. Photo: Dirk Jonker
VIDEO: Storm makes for wild ferry ride across Kootenay Lake

The video was captured by ferry employee Dirk Jonker

Dr. Bonnie Henry gives her daily media briefing regarding Covid-19 for the province of British Columbia in Victoria, B.C, Monday, December 7, 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward
BREAKING: Toddler marks youngest British Columbian to die related to COVID-19

Child one of eight people to die from virus this weekend

Pharmacist Barbara Violo arranges all the empty vials of the Oxford-AstraZeneca COVID-19 vaccines that she has provided to customers at the Junction Chemist which is a independent pharmacy during the COVID-19 pandemic in Toronto, on Monday, April 19, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Nathan Denette
B.C. to open up AstraZeneca vaccines for all people 40+, set up clinics in hot spots

A total of 13 neighbourhoods and communities will receive the AstraZeneca vaccine

Carver Ken Sheen had almost finished work on a large cowboy carving commissioned by the City of Williams Lake to replace the original overlooking the Stampede Grounds when fire broke out Friday, April 18 at his property between Williams Lake and Quesnel. (Pine River Carving Facebook photos)
Cow boss statue destined for Williams Lake Stampede Grounds goes up in flames

Carver Ken Sheen lost the statue, all his tools and his shop in the blaze

Most Read