Kevin Sear’s cube van was stolen from the street outside his Surrey home on Thursday morning, March 8. (submitted photo)

Vegas shooting survivor from B.C. has work truck stolen from outside home

Kevin Sears’ cube van, with Plumbtec Mechanical Inc. lettering, went missing Thursday morning

SURREY — When it rains, it pours – and right now, it’s pouring for Kevin Sears.

The Surrey man, a survivor of the mass shooting in Las Vegas last fall, had his truck stolen from outside his Fraser Heights-area home on Thursday morning (March 8).

A plumbing and heating contractor, Sears drives a white cube van with Plumbtec Mechanical Inc. painted on the side, licence plate 730 3KL.

The 2006 Ford went missing at around 4 a.m., Sears figures.

“I heard something,” he said. “It was parked on the street right in front of my house.

“I’m driving around right now trying to spot it. I have no idea where it might be, and there’s no GPS.… That thing has been around the Lower Mainland for 18 years.”

• READ MORE: Vegas shooting survivor from Surrey retraces steps at concert site, honoured at hockey game, from Feb. 28.

Sears said the truck has been broken into before, but never stolen.

“We have had a couple of vehicles broken into in our neighbourhood, but I’m not sure about whole vehicles stolen,” he said.

“They just want the contents.”

Late last month, Sears found the strength to return to the scene of the largest mass shooting in U.S. history.

With his wife and friends, he flew back to Las Vegas, where he was struck by a gunman’s bullet during the Route 91 Harvest Music Festival last October, and walked the concert grounds again.

He brought along a custom-made “Vegas Strong” hockey jersey to wear at the Golden Knights’ hockey game against the Vancouver Canucks on Feb. 23, and was honoured on the arena’s big screen during the game.

In Vegas last October, Sears, his wife, Coleen, and another couple were enjoying the music of country musician Jason Aldean when all hell broke loose.

“I dove on top of my wife and another lady nearby, and took a bullet,” he recently recalled. “It probably would have hit either Coleen or the other lady.”



tom.zillich@surreynowleader.com

Like us on Facebook Follow us on Instagram and follow Tom on Twitter

Just Posted

North Cowichan celebrates public art for Local Government Awareness Week

North Cowichan is showcasing a piece of public art in Crofton in… Continue reading

VIDEO: SAR reinforcements from up Island arrive Sunday to help search for Ben Kilmer

Family, RCMP ‘extremely happy’ with the search effort so far, search manager tells volunteers

Good Samaritan helps extinguish car fire in Ladysmith

A woman was behind the wheel of a Chevy Impala on a… Continue reading

Is Steve Nash Vancouver Island’s best athlete of all-time?

As Captain Canada gets ready to enter basketball’s Hall of Fame it’s time to debate his legacy

Who is Vancouver Island’s greatest athlete ever?

We want to know, you get to choose in a 64-athlete tournament bracket

Winnipeg’s JP Hoe performs in Ladysmith

Six-time Western Canada Music Award nominee and Winnipeg native JP Hoe performed… Continue reading

Woman’s death near Tofino prompts warning about ‘unpredictable’ ocean

Ann Wittenberg was visiting Tofino for her daughter Victoria Emon’s wedding

Will Taylor Swift’s high concert ticket prices stop scalpers?

Move by artist comes as B.C. looks to how to regulate scalpers and bots reselling concert tickets

36 fires sparked May long weekend, most due to lightning: BC Wildfire

As warmer weather nears, chief fire officer Kevin Skrepnek says too soon to forecast summer

Ariana Grande sends message of hope on anniversary of Manchester bombing

Prince William joins survivors and emergency workers for remembrance service

B.C. flood risk switches from snowmelt to rainfall: River Forecast Centre

Kootenays and Fraser River remain serious concerns

Pipeline more important than premiers meeting: Notley

“Canada has to work for all Canadians, that’s why we’re fighting for the pipeline”

Canadian government spending tens of millions on Facebook ads

From January 2016 to March 2018, feds spent more than $24.4 million on Facebook and Instagram ads

VIDEO: How to use naloxone to stop a fentanyl overdose

ANKORS’ Chloe Sage shows what to do when someone is overdosing

Most Read